Social entrepreneurship is taking off across the globe. For the under 18 crowd, however, it appears that much less is happening and the word has yet to get out. Paul Lamb, a Man on a Mission, wonders how to engage the new generation.

Case in point… a couple of weeks ago I served as a judge for the Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE) business competition.

High school student teams had to launch actual or virtual businesses that were judged in part on the basis of social responsibility, civic engagement and environmental awareness. When I asked the top competing high school teams what a social entrepreneur was, not a single student knew the answer…

Consider this: the volunteer rate for young people ages 12 to 18 in the United States is nearly twice the rate of that for adults. Yet, there are relatively few resources for training and promoting social entrepreneurship among that age group –in the US or abroad.

That being the case… we need to answer the following questions:

• As 500 million young people enter the workforce over the next decade, how do we expect to nurture a thriving movement of social entrepreneurs if they are largely left out of the equation?

How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

What projects stand out as good examples of best practices in the Youth Social Enterprise (YSE) space?

• Finally, if you were emperor for a day, how would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

I have invited a number of experts in the field to join us for this discussion, including Vansouk Lianemany, whom I helped develop a T-shirt business run entirely by ex-gang youth in the San Francisco East Bay.

Please jump right in on the above questions!


Clare Mulvany – May 16, 2006 4:34 pm (#12 Total: 88)

Young Social Innovators.. and more.

Greetings all.

One of the finest examples of accelerating youth social entrepreneurship in Ireland comes from an organisation called ‘Young Social Innovators’ (www.youngsocialinnovators.ie). Since its establishment in 2002, over 7,000 young Irish people have participated, based in over 200 schools across the country.

Young Social Innovators works on the premise that early involvement in social awareness projects leads to a lifetime of involvement. The organisation works with the Irish Department of Education to deliver an awards programme and create structures and platforms in which young people can address social problems.

Critical components include; – Youth defined projects: The participants define and decide on their projects themselves. Projects can be anything from setting up local youth centres to promoting healthy eating in schools. The teachers act only as a resource and support. -Teamwork: The youth work in teams to identify a social issue they feel they can change. Teamwork is a key component to developing the planning and collaboration skills that will serve them later in life. Young Social Innovators provides planning resources and training to the students and teachers to assist. -Healthy competition: At the end of the year, following regional competitions, the ‘best’ innovative projects are selected to showcase at a national forum. Category winners and an overall winner are awarded. The competition recognises the talents and efforts of participants, and the award ceremony is a huge highlight in the participant’s year. -Backing of the National Media: The Irish Times, one of Ireland’s leading newspapers is a sponsor of the project. To coincide with the National showcase, the Irish Times publishes a supplement telling the stories of the young social innovators. Last year participants also had a chance to produce a radio programme about their experiences which was broadcast on one of the main stations.

There are other organisations at college level with then engage the students when they reach that stage. One such is Suas (the Irish word for ‘up’- www.suas.ie), and much like the ‘undergrad chapters’ of EonFire, promotes leadership and social engagement around college societies. It also runs an international volunteer programme in which participants get a chance to run programmes in India and Kenya for the summer months when they are not in college. During term time, Suas also invites social entrepreneurs into colleges to discuss their life stories. So their needs to be links in the chain- opportunities to bridge the transition from school to university level.

All in all, these organisations are shifting the perceptions of social entrepreneurship, making it ‘trendy’, ‘hip’, and importantly, providing frameworks to act as springboards for further action. However the shift from ‘voluntarism’ to ‘social entrepreneurship’ has not happened on a large scale, yet. Most Irish people have never heard of the phrase ‘social entrepreneurship’; so part of the solution it is getting the message out. Once it is on radar screen, then young people can start to examine which course of action to take.

Lots more to do, but interesting starting points.

Van Ajemian – May 16, 2006 11:54 am (#1 Total: 88)

Engaging Youth to Be Social Entrepreneurs

(This is a reply to Paul Lamb’s post of this date.)

Hello, Paul.

Good questions.  Before sharing thoughts in coming days, I submit these observations and conclusions:

(1) there are never enough natural social entrepreneurs in any generation to meet all the challenges before that generation;  hence, the usefulness of proactively promoting social entrepreneurship–if one believes that social entrepreneurship is part of the solution to what ails humankind;

(2) I am unaware of anybody of celebrity advocating, let alone mentioning, social entrepreneurship as a rewarding and honorable career option for high schoolers and college students;

(3) unfortunately, the number of teachers and professors who understand, believe in, and teach social entrepreneurship might be counted on the fingers of one’s hands [I exaggerate a bit];  note that there are professors who dispute the validity of social entrepreneurship and will oppose the creation of such a course and note that not all business schools are suffused with the spirit of social entrepreneurship [when asked last September whether they knew what the Millennium Development Goals were, not one of some sixty MBA candidates in a course at the USC Marshall School of Business raised a hand];

(4) social entrepreneurship struggles at the high-school level;  AP [advanced placement] courses take so much of a gifted student’s time and are so preferred because of the impression upon college admission committees that there is no time in the day for social entrepreneurship;

(5) it is prudent for those who believe in the value of social entrepreneurship to supplement grants and sponsorships as much as possible, by dedicating as much profit as possible from social enterprises into social entrepreneurship;

(6) the relationship between social entrepreneurship and the prevailing consumerism needs to be explained, because the two are not automatically compatible;  indeed, the latter debilitates the former.

Van Ajemian

mfidelman – May 16, 2006 1:18 pm (#2 Total: 88)
Center for Civic Networking

investment capital and incubators

provide environments that allow people (young and otherwise) to jump in and attack social problems

investment capital, and some of the basic supports of the workplace (ability to earn a living, health insurance) wouldn’t hurt

karenborchert – May 16, 2006 1:32 pm (#3 Total: 88)
The Campus Kitchens Project

The Campus Kitchens Project: One "Leadership Laboratory" for Young SEs

Hello!

I wanted to offer by example one US-based take on developing young social entrepreneurs.

To learn more about CKP, you can find us at www.campuskitchens.org.

Briefly: Each Campus Kitchen is hosted by a college, university, or high school, and aims to engage young people in leading a small nonprofit effort serving their local neighborhood’s hunger needs. Each Campus Kitchen gleans surplus food from on-campus dining halls and local food banks; prepares and delivers meals to area social service agencies and individuals; teaches basic food preparation and culinary skills to unemployed and underemployed men and women; and provides service learning opportunities for students.

The best part is that all of this work is led by our next generation of leaders, business people, public servants, educators and non-profit professionals. Our student volunteers ARE The Campus Kitchens Project, and their work is what makes CKP tick. Everything–from food recycling to job training to special initiatives for clients–has the fingerprints of college students all over it.

A lot of our challenges right now are in helping young people take the lessons they are learning and the very innovative approaches they’re developing to community need and applying them to their career choices and futures. Advice on how people have successfully helped young people make the transition from "volunteer" to "social entrepreneur" would be very welcome.

abc4all – May 16, 2006 1:38 pm (#4 Total: 88)
A Better Community For All (ABC4All)

How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

One answer – perhaps a very important answer – comes from an excellent website devoted to youth throughout the world: Taking IT Global.

TITG is described as "an online community that connects youth to find inspiration, access information, get involved, and take action in their local and global communities." http://www.takingitglobal.org/

Within 10 minutes of posting the ABC4All Global Mentoring TEAM Project on TITG, 2 persons joined. More young people from other countries have since joined, with the Country of Ghana, alone, already represented by four such persons: http://projects.takingitglobal.org/abc4allglobalteam

This web site has great potential for adressing all of the issues in the discussion of "Engaging youth to be social entrepreneurs."

A review of the many featurues of the website, including the fact that all languages are represented, gave ABC4All instant international exposure.

Respectfully, Burton Danet, Ph.D. Co-Founder, ABC4All http://ABC4All.net

quaziahmed – May 16, 2006 3:21 pm (#5 Total: 88)

Thoughts on growth of Social Entrepreneurship in Bangladesh

Hi! This is Quazi from Bangladesh– a country which continues to produce, among many others, social entrepreneurs like Mohammad Yunus of Grameen Bank, Fazle Hasan Abed of BRAC–arguably the largest and the one of the most successful NGOs in the world today. But unfortunately, people in this country enter into social entrepreneurship late in their careers. This is what some of us are trying to chnage through a organization called "Futureleaders". We are going all over Bangladesh (6 broad Divisions to begin with) to encourage youth to choose SE as a profession and it seems that we are able present excellent role model examples. The interesting news is that a multi-donor funded project named KATALYST expressed serious interest to work with Professor Yunus’s Grameen group to promote a particular brand of Social Enterprises that Yunus calls "Social Business Enterprises(SBEs)" which is a business (not a nonprofit, that is) with a social mission; so much so, that the "owners" choose not to take dividends beyond 5% or so. Of course, the business should be returning the initial investment made by the sponsors and others. The idea is that there are many "do-gooders" in society but there aren’t any concrete conceptual or institutional framework for the growth of such SBEs. Dr. Yunus read a paper titled "Social Entrepreneurs are the Solution" at the 2006 Skoll Forum on Social entrepreneurship at Said Business School, Oxford University. I was also one of the participants there and if you are interested to read the article, send me an email and I will be able to send you a soft copy.

As the Founder and CEO of Futureleaders, I am working hard to develop a model on how to inspire youth to choose SE as a vocation in a country like ours where so many economic, social and environmental challenges are;there. Unfortunately, our traditional education system has kept little room for curricular innovations to introduce;responsible business education. The good news, though, is that recently I was successful in introducing a Corporate Social Resposibility course in the undergraduate business program at a private universiy in Bangladesh and I have been asked to teach that course, as there are hardly any faculty who can possibly teach a course such as this. As I also lead a team that runs the Bangladesh Professional Chapter of Net Impact (www.netimpact.org), I could utilize the resources of the Net Impact website to convince the Vice Chancellor of that particular university to introduce the subject.

Enough from me now. I would appreciate if anyone sends me links to resources where I can learn about how to turn a sizable portion of yourh into SEs for the betterment of the individual, society and the world at large.

—————————————— Quazi M. Ahmed Founder and CEO Futureleaders Bangladesh Email:quazi.ahmed@futureleaders-bd.com Phone: +88-01711561861(mobile) ——————————————

jimfruchterman – May 16, 2006 3:50 pm (#6 Total: 88)
Benetech

More optimistic about Social Entrepreneurship at the college level

I think that college and professional school students are really engaging in the SE movement. So far this year I’ve spoken to students at Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, Harvard, Columbia, University of the Pacific and have commitments to speak at MIT and Geneva (this week). And I’m not alone: often I’m just one of a long series of social entrepreneurs spreading the word.

That’s not to say more needs to be done. Five years ago the attention was much less and ten years ago non-existent. If you believe in a better world in the future, we need to invest time in students and capture their hearts, minds and imaginations!

kevinbao – May 16, 2006 4:00 pm (#7 Total: 88)
Eonfire – Future Social Entrepreneurs Network

Eonfire…. We’re trying to solve this question!

Hi Paul et al.

A pleasure to meet you all virtually. TakingITglobal is key infrastructure to encourage social entrepreneurship for youth.

However, a group of undergrads from across Canada and America want to take it one step further at college campuses. We’re building Eonfire – Future Social Entrepreneurs Network (www.eonfire.org) and in a nutshell, it’s a student driven network with campus chapters (like Engineers without Borders or Net Impact), but centered on social innovation, for undergrads, and focused on incubating new social enterprises and initiatives. Ultimately, we want to develop youths’ potential to drive positive social change through using their creativity, business acumen and entrepreneurial prowess.

We’re 20 students from Arizona State, Columbia, Duke, Harvard, NYU, Rice, Simon Fraser, Stanford, University of Alberta, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt. Our advisors include individuals from Ashoka, Engineers Without Borders Canada, Idealist, KaosPilots, Net Impact, NYU, the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship, the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford, and Youth Venture.

We’re about 1 year old, and still at the bootstrapping startup stage, but so far, so good. Lots of work and challenges ahead…especially on how to add more value to undergrad students that are aspiring social entrepreneurs. National social entrepreneurship conferences for undergrads, and campus chapters that host events help, but we also want to cut down the learning curve of the social entrepreneurial process. How can we better facilitate incubating new social enterprises? Added legal and financial advice? Mentors? Peer support?

And some responses to your question below:

1) • As 500 million young people enter the workforce over the next decade, how do we expect to nurture a thriving movement of social entrepreneurs if they are largely left out of the equation?

Great question. This is why we started Eonfire. How do we get plugged into this field and develop our potential when there are few universities teaching this stuff? Our answer: the student chapter. This way, students can show documentaries and videos (New Heros and Ashoka DVDs) on campus, organize their own events and conferences, invite guest speakers in (like leading social entrepreneurs), organize social venture competitions, and incubate their own projects. These activities allow for leadership transfer. The student chapter creates a space to experiment and try with other like minded souls…which is very different from any student club out there.

2) • How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

The stories of social entrepreneurs need to be told, face to face. It is the most effective way of inspiring young people to see that another way is possible.

As already mentioned, investment capital in either social enterprise competition or organizations that support young social entrepreneurs (eg. Youth Venture, Echoing Green). Like with the entire sector, money (or lack of) is a tremendous hurdle.

3) • What projects stand out as good examples of best practices in the Youth Social Enterprise (YSE) space?

Taking it Global, Youth Venture, Youth Social Enterprise Initiative…

4) • Finally, if you were emperor for a day, how would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

We’re building it at the undergrad level, grassroots and bottom up. It’s called Eonfire. Who needs an emperor!?

If anyone has feedback for us, feel free to comment. We’re still at the process of fleshing the details out, and starting programs and services that will be rolling out this Fall. Ultimately, we see Eonfire, a grassroots driven network, as social entrepreneurship infrastructure.

plamb – May 16, 2006 4:15 pm (#8 Total: 88)
Paul Lamb

Thoughts on the conversation so far

Folks: We are off to a great start! Good thoughts, ideas, and comments all around. Some quick feedback…

Van, great idea to get a celebrity (someone a little younger than Robert Redfordperhaps:) on board as a Spokesperson. Who would make a good one? Also, you mention that SE is often not compatible with consumerism. True, but I think it can be and if we are talking about youth culture it is something perhaps worth exploring further – that is, making SE hip and compatible (in the best sense) with mainstream forces that attract youth…MySpace, MTV, etc…At least in the US, as we all know these forces tend to be smack in the middle of the consumer world.

Anyone have a good, specific answer to Karen’s question about how to move young people from volunteerism to social entrepreneurism? Many would argue, I think, that SE is really just an evolved form of volunteerism that includes a more proactive and mission-driven approach to making a difference. Which leads to the question that has been indirectly raised by a number of folks…what exactly is a social entrepreneur. Best to let a true expert, Professor Paul Light, answer this one at http://paullight.blogspot.com/

Quazi, great to hear about FutureLeaders work in Bangladesh. You may also want to check in with the youth enterprise folks at Thai Rural Net http://www.thairuralnet.org/ and view some other Youth Social Enterprise resources I posted above. Speaking of resources, you raise a good point about the need for SE curricula and teachers qualified to teach it at the college and high school levels. Anyone have some good tips for youth SE curricula and teacher training materials? 

Finally, Jim, you mention you are doing some speaking on SE on the college level. Is anybody doing the same on the high school/middle school level?

Cheers,

Paul

michelleaa – May 16, 2006 4:18 pm (#9 Total: 88)

What about the 12 year old set…

My daughter is quite active as a volunteer for ForestEthics and enjoys working on the Victoria’s Dirty Secret Campaign for us but she is also a budding entrepreneur. are there resources for her environmentally sustainable small business ideas? she has the financing in hand (thank goodness) but needs to draft a business plan for her investor–a retired .com person she/we know….ideas?

Susan Cippoletti – May 16, 2006 4:25 pm (#10 Total: 88)
Girl Scout Program Developer

Rural Girl Scouts as Social Entrepreneurs

I would like to share some ideas about a new, national Girl Scout program I have developed along with my colleagues at the Learning Innovation and Technology Consortium. The program is being piloted in 22 communites acorss the United States. The program, entitled Challenge & Change: Challenge Yourself & Change the World teaches teen girls in rural America HOW to be social entrepreneurs. The curriculum was developed with contemporary youth development practices at its core. We know teens are more likely to become involved in a project and stay involved if they get to make the decisions on everything from what topic is addressed to how the project is structured. Challenge & Change builds off that premise by framing the entire curriculum on girls developing their own sustainable community based projects. Girl Scouts supports their efforts by providing grants to local communities. With the funding, girls can participate in an intensive, subsidized week long training, develop customized marketing materials and have access to a website that allows the girls to connect with other teens involved in Challenge & Change anywhere in the United States.

Following the training, the girls are asked to use the resources and their new skills to become social entrepreneurs in their rural communities. To ensure success, girls develop a local project that is important to them personally. EXAMPLE: Girls could address teen drinking and driving because the rate of accidents has increased greatly and affected them and their friends. Girls working from their own aspirations is a key to success. We know girls will stay with their projects if they are addressing an issue they feel is important AND can help their community at the same time. We hope each grant will train twenty to thirty girls in each community. As stated above, this program is new and is in the early pilot phase so we have no concrete examples of successful local projects but we are keeping our fingers crossed. Feel free to email me for further information on Challenge & Change.

chrismacrae – May 16, 2006 4:31 pm (#11 Total: 88)

Actually, the first thing we could do is take hold of the curriculum of social studies in US schools and update it, or burn it. My daughter is 9 and goes to a Catholic School. I was shocked that homework from her social studies book a few week ago required her to learn parrot fashion this definition: an entrepreneur is a man who starts a business and invests his money in it.

Since I would like schooling to get into the 21st Century …I think we could probably make a good case for burning all school books on social studies, and start again. Here’s an extract I wrote on this at the weekend for http://zeromillion.com which like www.takingitglobal.org is an interesting website convened by university students. I would love to know if there is any serious content site in the social ares convened by an even younger group

Imagine if each crop of 9 year olds, 10 year olds, 11 year olds, 12 year olds were connected by a web-navigators driving test. What themes would you ask each grade about? (and would all 50 year olds pass web9?)

 Here are some examples I would suggest we introduce at 9 and keep on making deeper fun as well as more integral in practice at each grade up. Some assumptions of why we need a social learning revolution that early are at http://ninenow.blogspot.com/

 Why not let our kids write postcards to each other that celebrate each other’s nations, rituals etc . Just like when we enjoy travelling- what’s most fun, exciting about each other’s cultures. Link quicktopic http://www.quicktopic.com/12/D/tfrfXSANMSxP

 Why not also integrate some postcards as web-logs which testify on round the world problems. Perhaps, each year’s grade could become experienced in one more crisis map. For example, which of our 9-year olds are in a place which has what sorts of crises  with clean water? With energy at 10?  With ill-health at 11?  With poverty at 12? Let’s raise the questions for all adults to see and link some answers to. But don’t let’s teach that mankind already has all the answers – while a child’s community at any poorest or war-torn coordinate of the globe clearly demonstrates we have not.

 Let’s develop the idea that the greatest use that can be made of virtual (interactive) tools is exploration geared to finding your own deepest mentors through life and helping other do likewise. These will increasingly vary by child’s place, by child’s interests, by whether a child has lots of time-rich and emotionally happy mentors in her family life or not.

All this is what we in richer countries could be helping our children understand

This also links up to what I understand to be a key learning from ashoka’s world class adult social entrepreneurs working in poor countries. They know many of the projects that could now be openly licensed across localities most needing them but often need to re-prove the project before anyone will finance the work. In this case its very often the young who step up to the plate to be the volunteers

We might infer that the young naturally get community and deeply value social entrprenurs unless we teach it out of them.

 

Martin Smith – May 16, 2006 6:03 pm (#13 Total: 88)
StartingBloc

What is social entrepreneurship again?

Hi Paul and all.

All great thoughts above, really agree with what chris and jim have offered.

I run a non-profit organization called StartingBloc that trains outstanding undergrads and young professionals on social entrepreneurship and corporate social innovation. StartingBloc now engages undergraduates at 300 universities and young professionals at over 100 corporations and social enterprises around the world. But, after three years of exposure to the hottest minds and organizations in the field (Greg Dees, Jon Schnur, Ashoka, Skoll), I am just beginning to construct a framework of what exactly social entrepreneurship is and how it plays into our economic system.

I think it is wonderful that leaders in the field of social enterprise (Ashoka, Skoll, ect) are interested in training social enterprise to youth under 18. I guess my main concern with teaching youth social entrepreneurship is that we don’t seem to have it figured out yet. We did not teach economics at the high school level until we had it figured out at the graduate and undergraduate level.

We need to develop a robust understanding of what exactly social entrepreneurship and why eleemosynary institutions like not-for-profits and mission based for-profits are critical to a healthy economic system. We need to develop a new economics that defines social entrepreneurship and corporate social innovation and explains why they are necessary.

That is not to say that we cannot start teaching youth what we know today. I think we can inspire and challenge youth to question traditional (particularly American) notions of value and success. Speaking to youth at forums is a start. So is giving youth $1000 to create their own projects. But ultimately, our world is driven by one bottom line. It is not going to work for us to create a small tight-knit network of people who have a concept of social entrepreneurship. We need to challenge ourselves to figure out how social entrepreneurship figures into traditional notions of value creation. Once we create those models, I think it will be a lot easier to figure out how to teach youth.

• How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

Lets not forget that the private sector is probably the reason all of us are able to eat and cloth ourselves today (for better or worse). Stating the social entrepreneurship is the end all, be all and is going to make our world paradise is unrealistic. That is one of the reasons why the Omidyar Network still invests in for-profits, there simply is not enough wealth to create the standard of life that most of us on this network have even if it was aggressively redistributed.

We need to redefine value. We need to create a role for social entrepreneurship and corporate social innovation within our current economic system. Once we define what social entrepreneurship is, then we need to ask ourselves what do social entrepreneurs provide that neither government nor private firms can? A LOT IN MY OPINION. When we figure out the answer, then we can start defining what exactly it is social entrepreneurs do. Once we do that, we can start making social entrepreneurship/social enterprise an attractive and viable career option because we will actually know what it is. Then we can say, you can be whatever you want, a doctor, a baseball player, or a social entrepreneur.

In the meantime, I think we can try to focus on greatly expanding the efforts of projects that have already started to focus on this space, like Triskeles and Youth Venture. We can get today’s young social entrepreneurs (20-30 years old) mentoring high school students. We can provide more funding for young entrepreneurs. Also, we should focus on funding organizations in the 18-35 year old space that are doing this. Ultimately, I think more results are going to be seen in that population in the next 5-10 years.

• What projects stand out as good examples of best practices in the Youth Social Enterprise (YSE) space?

Youth Venture and Triskeles in the high school space.

• Finally, if you were emperor for a day, how would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

StartingBloc is launching a new social networking tool for social innovators of today and tomorrow. With a lot of the functionality of MySpace and Facebook, 1Bloc will provide information and opportunities in social entrepreneurship to the 18-30 year old population. The site is in pre-beta mode now and will debut after a feature article in Fast Company in July. It is our goal to have 50,000 young changemakers sharing stories, best practices, and resources on 1Bloc by September 2007.

K.L.SRIVASTAVA – May 16, 2006 7:33 pm (#14 Total: 88)
Researcher and Consultant,Hyderabad,INDIA

Catching them young!

Hi Paul and all,

Many thanks for starting this very important and timely discussion.

I have heard some people arguing that social entrepreneurship can not be taught. They feel that social entrepreneurs are either born or produced by certain local situations. The society can atbest spot and support them.

 To make progress in educational endeavors, we have to move beyond this myth.

In India, Centre for Social Initiatives and Management (www.csim.org) is doing some pioneering work in this direction. This organization has attempted to familiarize Social Entrepreneurs hip among local college students and other youth.

CSIM is also trying to collaborate with National Social Service (NSS) program in Hyderabad.

In this context, I specially liked the suggestions of Jim.

Thanks and regards,

KL

plamb – May 16, 2006 10:09 pm (#15 Total: 88)
Paul Lamb

Quick Recap and checkin

Fantastic ideas and resources folks…please keep them coming. Let me provide a brief summary notes or suggested resources to date, and offer some next step suggestions:

1. Participants: so far from North America, South Asia and Europe. Any voices from Africa or Central/South America out there?

2. Resources:College-level or above Social Entrepreneurism training/support:(http://www.eonfire.org/, http://www.startingbloc.org/, Futureleaders(Bangladesh), www.csim.org, www.takingitglobal.org, www.netimpact.org

3. Resources: High-School or below:resources, www.youngsocialinnovators.ie, www.suas.ie, www.triskeles.org  

4. Specific projects:http://www.campuskitchen.org/, Girl Scouts Challenge & Change program (U.S.)

I think we have already gathered some terrific answers to our starting point questions, but lets get some more thoughts on:

• As 500 million young people enter the workforce over the next decade, how do we expect to nurture a thriving movement of social entrepreneurs if they are largely left out of the equation?

How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

What projects stand out as good examples of best practices in the Youth Social Enterprise (YSE) space?

• Finally, if you were emperor for a day, how would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

Also, I think it is worth repeating what a couple of folks have already brought up. To nurture youth as social enterpreneurs we need to go to youth and not expect them to come to adults. So I have to ask, how can we get some more younger voices that we need to hear from to participate in this discussion? Please encourage any age 0-25 social entrepreneurs you know to jump in and to take us down from the thirty thousand foot level and into the youth trenches. What is working for them (or not) and what can we older youth and adults learn from it?

Second, only a few mentions of technology so far, even though we know that the current and future generations of youth are and will be turning to technology in greater numbers for social enterprise efforts. (Martin, your mention of the all new 1bloc and social networking tools is right on point here). Speaking of which, can we get some pointers to pictures, video and audio clips, blogs, etc. that show and discuss young social entrepreneurs in action? Aren’t we supposed to be on the cutting edge of innovation here? I’ll start the multimedia frenzy with a link to some pictures of young folks competing in last month’s Students for the Advancement of Global  Entrepreneurship competition in Chico, California: http://www.flickr.com/photos/85144337@N00

Finally, from the housekeeping department, please be sure to provide an Internet link (if one exists) to any project or resource you happen to mention.

Onwards,

Paul 

p.s. I will be providing some final summary notes of this discussion to all, so check back on May 23rd or email me at pauljlamb@gmail.com if you wish to have them.

 

thirstyfish – May 17, 2006 7:26 am (#16 Total: 88)
CEO, THIRSTY-FISH Story Marketing

Confessions of a social entrepreneur

What a great conversation!

As a social entrepreneur since the age of 21, this topic is dear to my heart. In my early years of starting nonprofit ventures, I was baptized in the Harvard Business School/McKinsey approach. The majority of my mentors, board members, and colleagues came from this worldview and experience set.

Over time, I started to feel that something was missing from the conversation…a vocabulary that was about people, relationships, values, and most importantly culture. I also discovered the power of storytelling, as a tool for framing new ideas into cultural adoption. And for the past four years, I have devoted my time and energy to this specific pursuit – inventing a new lens and perspective to the marketing of social innovation.

Which leads me to the original question – how to make social entrepreneurship relevant to young people. The answer is, it already is, but perhaps not in the conventional sense of what we define as "social entrepreneurship" in the academic, business, or think-tank sense. Gen Y/Millenials are especially hard-wired for the times we live in. Many struggle with the walking contradictions of modern living – to enjoy the trappings, comforts, and conveniences of modern living while still finding a means to make a meaningful contribution to the world. Young people tend to sit on the fence unlike any other generation – with a wanton embrace of consumerism as a means towards self-expression (you are what you wear, you are what you eat) along with an astute distrust that the way things are may not sustain our culture for long.

Here’s a few thoughts on how to reach young people:

(1) Let them be a part of the story. Everyone wants to tell their story, and young people today, expect to be able to tell their story (blogs, IM, and commercial customization has engrained this expectation). If I can’t PARTICIPATE and help to choose my own adventure, I will pick up my ball and go play someplace else.

(2) Embrace popular culture. We live in a branded society, where we all make split second decisions about the relative worth of something based on a blink instinct. If you expect to be paid attention to, you need to present a culturally relevant MESSAGE and PACKAGE.

(3) Business speak will only go so far. B-school gobbly-gook does exactly inspire passion, conviction, and authenticity. Instead, as many others suggests in previoud threads, we need to seek and celebrate new cultural icons that represent the values of youth and social entrepreneurship. Its only way to help people dream a new dream for themselves.

On to some friends and resources:

(1) Working For Good – www.workingforgood.com – Co-launched by a client of mine, this site provides an expanding curriculum designed for young and aspiring social entrepreneurs.

(2) Ode Magazine – www.odemagazine.com – Its like Fast Company for social innovation that balances a pop culture pityness with a european sensibility for getting down to the core of the essence. I’ve never dog-eared and underlined a magazine more.

(3) The SHIFT Foundation – www.shiftfoundation.org – a client of mine in Australia that is working to transform the culture of leadership development around the world, with a recognition that young emerging global leaders represent one of our greatest untapped resources.

Okay, that’s my story for now. I look forward to the continued conversations and explorations. Paul, thanks a million for organizing this thread!

Much love,

Michael michael@thirsty-fish.com www.thirsty-fish.com

garykosman – May 17, 2006 10:14 am (#17 Total: 88)
America Learns

developing a sense of self-efficacy

Colleagues of mine in a social justice fellowship program I’m a part of have been discussing this idea a bunch and we keep coming back to the idea of needing to first help students develop a strong sense of self efficacy while giving them an opportunity to wrestle with social challenges.  One of the models we’ve spent some time with is the science fair.

 

If you’re not familiar with science fair process, it basically gives students (often at the elementary and middle school level) an opportunity to perform a science experiment of their choice, and to then write up and display their findings, ideas, etc. for the entire school community (other students, teachers, parents).

 

QUESTION: What if young students were required to also participate in a "social issues/solutions" fair? 

 

Here’s the “rough overview on a couple napkins” low down:

 

The concept:
– Helping to develop students’ sense of self efficacy by giving students an opportunity to create and display projects in a science fair-type setting that seek to fix the roots of social challenges. 

The goals/short term outcomes:
- Give students a strong sense of self efficacy, especially when it comes to their abilities of thinking about and tackling social challenges.

– Give students time to learn about issues affecting their community, while not asking all students to address the issue in the same way (e.g., no class projects in which everybody does the same action).

– Give students a chance to apply what they’re learning and experiencing in life to a social issue that people grapple with daily;

– Motivate adults to value and take students’ ideas into consideration.

– Some students become so motivated to try out their solution that they’ll partner with organizations or create new ones to try out their solutions.

Possible structure:
– The school/organization holding the "science-type fair" partners with one or a coalition of nonprofits that present the students with an issue they’re grappling with.

– Designated individuals work with that nonprofit/coalition to create school/organization-approved lesson plans that span a certain time period to tie the presented issue into the school’s curriculum;

– Students present their projects in a science fair type setting;

– The nonprofit/coalition at issue judges the projects and possibly adapts students’ ideas as their own and/or offers guidance to motivated students who want to bring their projects to reality (either through partnering with existing organizations or creating new ones).

 

Has anybody tried anything like this?  What were the results?

 

We’ve also been thinking about the Intel Science Talent Search as a model and/or as a tie in to the science fair idea. 

greg.wolff – May 17, 2006 12:06 pm (#18 Total: 88)
Community Network Services @ Ricoh Innovations

Be the change you seek

Entrepreneurship is the power to change. The best way to engage young people and nurture social entrepreneurs? Show youth that they have this power. Make entrepreneurship a credible alternative to getting a "good" job or being a victim of "the system."

Entrepreneurs need access to markets so they can see what works and what doesn’t. Uth TV (www.uthtv.com) provides one example of a marketplace for media created by youth. As society moves to an information and services economy, we need marketplaces that better serve the needs of youths and their communities. What are the best emerging markets for services provided by youths? Do they exist today?

Across the US, hundreds of thousands of students sell magazine subscriptions, cookies, and other items to raise funds for schools and other organizations. What if they were selling youth created media instead? For example, imagine a teen magazine based on the model of PLOS journals. (Public Library of Science — www.plos.org)

In summary, here are some possible answers to Paul’s questions:

  • Nurture a movement of social entrepreneurs by creating exchanges (in the sense of markets) with guaranteed access for youth.
  • Engage young people by demonstrating that they have the power to create change. Show that they have a voice through their participation in the exchanges that have direct impact on their communities.
  • Build a movement by franchising successful social enterprises. Imagine a "Teen media network" actually run by teens. Local entrepreneurs start franchises in their communities that both create content and sell subscriptions as suggested above. This goes one step beyond TakingItGlobal to providing, co-creating, and sharing successful, sustainable models.
  • jbettles – May 17, 2006 1:06 pm (#19 Total: 88)
    Vokalize — amplifying the voice of customers

    social – entrepreneurship

    Hi all,

     

    A really great conversation that you’ve initiated Paul!  My primary thoughts relate to the phrase itself — social entrepreneurship.  If the question is how to foster social entrepreneurship, I’d suggest that we get to recognize that we’re talking about fostering entreprenurial acumen and creativity as well as applying that skill-set to the social realm.  Both are a mind set and at least one of those (entrepreneurship) is a skill-set.

     

    As it relates to entrepreneurial skills domestically – there’s quite a bit of pent up demand by youth to learn these skills.  While it’s a bit dated, a survey by the Gallup Poll indicates that many students, particularly minority youth, have a strong interest in entrepreneurship:

     

    · 69% of high school students said that they wanted to start their own business

    · 75% of black youth said that they wanted to start their own business

    · 73% of the students said that independence was their primary motivation for wanting to start a business (and not monetary benefits).

    · 68% of the students said that it was very important for successful entrepreneurs or business owners to give something, in addition to providing employment, back to the community

    · 80% of black students said that it was very important for successful entrepreneurs or business owners to give something, in addition to providing employment, back to the community

     

    Moreover, the survey indicated that youth are not getting the training they want:

     

    · 9 out of 10 students rate their entrepreneurial knowledge as poor or fair at most

    · when asked to answer questions demonstrating basic entrepreneurial knowledge, high school students on average were only able to answer 44% of the questions correctly

    · 85% of students said they had been taught “practically nothing about” or “very little about” business and how it works

    · only 27% of students reported that they had taken a class in business or entrepreneurship

    · 84% of students said that it is “important” (36%) or “very important” (48%) that schools teach more about entrepreneurship and how to start a business

    · 67% of black youth said that it is “very important” that the nation’s schools teach students about entrepreneurship and business

     

    From this survey, you can see what’s necessary…  actually deliver on the skills that kids already want.  That’s awesome news! 

     

    As it relates to the social dimension, so as to not recreate the wheel, I’d suggest weaving the social element into youth-targeted entrepreneurial programs wherever they reside.  As social enterprises can be either for- or non-profit and require similar discipline (I disagree that social entrepreneurship is like volunteering), perhaps we get to define some new models of successful business relative to the models of Enron, Donald Trump, etc.  Why are we looking incremental programs?  Following Quasi’s comment, let’s develop curriculum and information tools that define, appropriately, blended value business models.  Are kids hearing about the triple bottom line measures that have been around for at least a decade?

     

    Beyond the above comments, a challenging element of the social dimension is a fundamental belief that one can impact the social realm.  In poll after poll, youth are less apt to seem themselves having the ability to affect social change.  The more youth can see the effects of their actions the better!  I, through Vokalize, have a particular interest in supporting social action through our consumer spending. 

     

    Lots of exciting opportunity!!

     

    Jennie

    plamb – May 17, 2006 7:47 pm (#20 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    Another pause for comments

    Folks: We are still cooking along, with some new folks adding fuel to the discussion. Some quick comments on today’s contributions…

    Michael, old man, I think you hit the nail squarely on the head with your comments about bringing young people into the fold in ways that make sense to them – by having them tell their stories, creating their own new voices, and embracing popular culture. Thanks also for the mention of curricula materials on www.workingforgood.com. A number of folks have asked about curricula.

    Gary, great idea to do a kind of social innovations science fair. Check out SAGE on the high school level – they do a great version of this via real and virtual student run business competitions that incorporate social responsibility, civic engagement, and environmental awareness. There seems to be more and more college level social sector competitions, business plan writing challenges, etc. all the time. On the techie front, San Jose, California, USA’s Tech Musuem of Innovation Awards (albeit for adults) is also a good model for this approach. See: www.techawards.org

    Greg, we absolutely need to create workable markets and exchanges that can engage young people in ways that drive them toward emerging and brand new opportunities. Your suggestion of a "Teen Media Network" seems to make sense both because it is an area where youth have a strong interest and because of the inherent business opportunity. Just need to call it "Teen Media Network for Good";)

    Jennie, great stats. As you point out, the interest is there among youth, but is not matched by training resources. Also an important reminder to build off of what already exists to avoid re-creating the wheel syndrome.

    Please keep it coming…

    Paul

    Sailendra Dev Appanah – May 17, 2006 8:21 pm (#21 Total: 88)
    YSEI

    Social movements have this in common with epidemics, that in order for them to spread, they must have an average reproduction rate of at least one. If not, the disease will never become an epidemic and the social movement will expend itself in time. If talented young people are not attracted and catalysed by social entrepreneurship, the movement could die out.

    Cultivating young social entrepreneurs means having to create the appropriate support systems that not only nurture the growth of emerging young social entrepreneurs but also mobilise enough resources for them to get started. In addition, an intense marketing & communications campaign around social entrepreneurship will help make it more sexy & appealing for youth and the public in general to embrace it.

    At the Youth Social Enterprise Initiative (www.ysei.org), we believe that any young person from any developing region with innovative ideas, commitment and vision for social change should have a chance to emerge as a social entrepreneur. Therefore, having access to appropriate support is necessary to realise their ideas into impact.

    Through its fellowship program (Emergence Fellows), selected entrepreneurs gain access to appropriate knowledge such as social venture planning tools, technical consulting through mentorship, diverse networks and start-up financing up to USD15,000.

    The fringe has always been a source for innovation. Social entrepreneurship is an innovation by itself that has to be championed from the fringe to the mainstream. Youth have a tendency to be early adopters and are therefore the perfect candidates to champion social entrepreneurship.

    Jel – May 18, 2006 5:45 am (#22 Total: 88)

    Communicating Social Enterprise to young people

    Hello All

    Very glad to have come upon this discussion.  I am a UK based researcher working with Enterprise Insight, http://www.starttalkingideas.org/ and the Social Enterprise Coalition, http://www.socialenterprise.org.uk/.  I am working with the above organisations in order to try and find the right campaign message to engage large numbers of young people in social enterprise.  

    Previous research has told us that the words ‘social enterprise’ can be a barrier, the term creates confusion, and/or a set of negative associations that can put young people off before they start.  So, if I was emperor for a day, the first thing I would do to go about building a Youth Social Enterprise Movement is to change the language.  To be clear, this doesn’t mean changing the policy or business use of the term, which is embedded and largely, though not entirely or consistently, understood by the policy community and current practitioners, but it does mean campaigning on a different message platform.

    But herein lies the rub, what to call it?  We are currently developing some messages and themes to test with young people. I wondered if the global community of social entrepreneurs and engaged people represented here wanted to throw some campaigning ideas into the pot and become part of the campaigning process.  So, how do we best communicate social enterprise to young people?

    In your opinion, what is the absolute bang on campaign message that would engage large numbers of young people in social enterprise?  You can’t use the words ‘social enterprise’ together!

    Love to hear your thoughts, and I will add the best ones into the campaign pot and find a way to keep you all posted on the progress of the message development.

    Many thanks

    Dr. Joanne Lacey, Qualitative Research Consultant, Jel Research

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Very

    Attachments:

    Joanne Lacey.jpg (303 KB)

    paul_hudnut – May 18, 2006 3:18 pm (#23 Total: 88)

    What’s in a phrase

    I recently finished teaching a new class at Colorado State University on "Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Business" to undergrads (so a little older students).

    I wouldn’t get too hung up on high school students not knowing the phrase "social entrepreneur", nor would I worry too much that we should have this whole area figured out before we start having young people learn about it. There is a lot of energy on the frontiers, and they have lots of other classes in areas where things have been "figured out".

    Based on my limited experience, students are very energized about an entrepreneurial approach to solving problems. It gives them some traction on these big global challenges, and there are many good examples out there (New Heroes series was a great intro). They are somewhat cynical about governments and large corporations, and have a lot of respect for entrepreneurs. As Stu Hart points out, many of these global challenges are huge market opportunities, and many are unserved markets (there is no competition).

    I recently went to a statewide high school science fair… there were some really cool "socially entrepreneurial" ideas for helping with climate change, water pollution, and disease. I doubt many of these students knew the term social entrepreneurship, but if they are doing it, does it matter if they know the name…  Perhaps these types of science fairs/Odyssey of the Mind activities could be used to provide "social entrepreneurship cases" and introduce them to the concept.

    As far as what do we call it to make it more appealing… well, I define an entrepreneur as "a revolutionary with a business model." I think this applies to social entrepreneurs as well.

    As far as other organizations that are involved, Interact (affiliated with Rotary), Engineers without Borders, CityYear. We are working on getting an "Entrepreneurs without Borders" type organization started between univerities.

    Interesting forum… I look forward to hearing what else is going on out there…

    K.L.SRIVASTAVA – May 19, 2006 2:18 am (#24 Total: 88)
    Researcher and Consultant,Hyderabad,INDIA

    An alternative phrase for ‘social enterprise’

    Joanne:

    You may try with another phrase to know the response of youth:

    Missionary Enterprise

    Thanks,

    KL

    Curt – May 19, 2006 7:57 am (#25 Total: 88)
    Founder, SAGE and Professor, CSU-Chico (USA)

    To Start: Entrepreneurship First, Social Second

    Good day, everyone. First, thank you, Paul Lamb, for leading this important discussion. Let me  apologize for the length of this email, but I hope some of the ideas will provoke more ways to think outside the "parallelogram."

    Second, both Paul and Van Ajemian have referred to a program called Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship—SAGE (http://www.csuchico.edu/sage).  I am SAGE’s founder, and  it is one of the outreach programs within the College of Business at California State University, Chico. SAGE combines (1) community service-learning, as a pedagogy with (2) social entrepreneurship, as a discipline.

    Third, before turning to Paul’s questions, allow me to provide a brief background about SAGE. SAGE provides a new educational structure and support network (e.g., a continuously updated website, handbooks, a manual of best practices, competitions, awards, prizes, recognition) for high school students to advance ethical business practices, social responsibility, civic engagement and environmental awareness worldwide through participation in entrepreneurship and community service, under the watchful eye of university students who serve as their consultants.  At the end of the academic year, students present their results orally and in writing to an external panel of judges at a "SAGE Tournament." SAGE has now grown from a small pilot program in Northern California three years ago to all of California, five additional states (NY, OH, ID, PA, SC), and 10 more countries. It has two primary target audiences:   high school students and university students. 

    SAGE competitions provide an opportunity to not only show off students’ efforts, but, also, “benchmark” themselves against other teams for future improvements. Among the judges at next week’s USA SAGE event are representatives from JA Worldwide, NFTE, and YES (Youth Employment Summit).

    Fourth,  I currnently am re-writing the SAGE business plan to have much greater emphasis on ENTREPRENEURSHIP and less weight on SOCIAL. This is essential for my long-term viability. After three years of spending countless hours raising operating cash, I now see it as essential to wean off donations as our only source of support. I learned this by reading a book by Jerr Boschee, Executive Director of the Institute for Social Entrepreneurs (Jerr is the keynote luncheon speaker at next week’s event-see attached).

    How will SAGE make "profit" to reinvest in outreach? THAT is a difficult question for me and for every other NGO that relies on the generosity of key donors each year (Ideas: interest earned from a "SAGE Bank" which makes microenterprise loans to high school SAGE Teams? Sale of a set of 23 lessons called "Turning Risk into Success," which blends for-profit with non-profit ideas for new ventures, or entering into a strategic partnership with organizations that provide such curriculum; allying with a socially responsible business (e.g, Starbucks?) in a cause-related marketing campaing).

    Now, as to Paul’s questions: (1) How do we expect to nurture a thriving movement of social entrepreneurs?

    Possible answers: (a) Through stronger collaborations with institutions of higher education (especially Colleges of Business), leveraging the "service-learning" pedagogy through organizations like Campus Compact. (b) Through more active involvemnt of business, civic and education leaders in the development of the youth in the community in ways that involve more than monetary contributions (e.g., serving on high school SAGE business advisory boards or judging competitions); (c) Through blending interscholastic competition woith intrascholatic cooperation as integral parts of a student’s experiential education program.

    (2) How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs?

    Possible Answers: (a) first, agree on what a social entrepreneur is. Greg Dees had a good start at defining SE, but he failed to include PROFIT and EARNED INCOME in his definition. Boschee’s definition is much better: "The art of simultaneously pursuing both a financial and a social ROI (the double bottom line)." (b) form a coalition of youth entrepreneurship organizations (e.g., JA, NFTE, YES, Virtual Enterprise, KAB (an ILO program), FFA, FBLA, DECA) and get them to support ENTREPRENEURSHIP with a conscience. Also, emphasize entrepreneurship education over "financial literacy"; one can read a balance sheet without ever trying to CREATE one; such a coalition could (and should) receive funding from the World Bank, UNICEF, and state and federal governments to adminster; (c) do more where students can showcase their products through national and international trade fairs and competitions; by seeing other best practices, they themselves will improve their own practices.

    (3) How would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

     

    Possible answers: (a) keep trying to link youth entrepreneurship (YE) to service-learning by authoring academic articles and presenting at conferences; (b) create an international listserv dedicated to YE; (c) create a YE "E-Bay" or virtual international marketplace, (d) ally ourselves with micro-enterprise lending institutions that will provide loans to YOUTH.

     

    Okay, that’s it for now. I look forward to reading more posts, and to learning more about each of your ideas and organizations.

     

    PS. If you would like to know more about the USA SAGE competiton this Friday in Brooklyn, NY, please see attached. Thank you.

     

    Attachments:

    USA SAGE Official Press Release- High School Students Compete in National Entrepreneurship Tournament.doc (176 KB)

    aecodera – May 19, 2006 8:58 am (#26 Total: 88)
    Audrey Codera

    Social Entrepreneurship

    Hi Paul,

    Curt sent me a link to this and encouraged me to join in the conversation. You pointed out several interesting facts.

    First, although I think having social entrepreneurs would indeed doa lot of good in the United States and around the world, I think we have to face the fact that just like entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship cannot be taught.

    I deal with underprivileged youth ages 15-30 years old in the Philippines and teach them the basics of setting up a business and maintaining it. We started the NGO in 2003 and have since then assisted a very small number of youth, although our effect on policy-making has been very substantial in promoting youth employment. I personally can only hope that our graduates and those who have had some successes (and I can tell everyone of one particular youth who did a 360 degree turn because of our program – without us telling him to change) would want, in the future to give back something to their communities.

    Sometimes it is a matter of including entrepreneurship and community service into the school curriculum. Sometimes it takes you or me to get our friends together to help us out of help some cause thet they feel strongly about – like my friend sending me an SMS message the other night asking how she can volunteer all the way from NY because I had dinner and watched a movie with her a month ago and we talked about everything including the work that I do. Sometimes the cause finds its way into people’s lives. Sometimes, you ahve to talk to young people (especially those dreaming of becoming rich) using the equation they know – using business or economic terms and showing them that if there is poverty or AIDS or such social ills, then no matter how much money they could ever earn for themselves, they will still face reality – that there will be crimes, discontents, etc. because people are not able to free themselves from social ills which is just another way of saying they are not happy.

    You must have read the book, Tipping Point. One thing that it points out is, words spread faster by word of mouth. Although there is a lot to be said about it – definitely people use the internet more, using print, videos or other types of advertisements can help an organization more. There is nothing like word of mouth to spread the news to people because, then the cause becomes personal. So I would say that although we may never get as much young people to be actively involved in the task of social entrepreneurship, if you keep on exposing them to other people who are trying to provide solutions to social ills, eventually, they will think about it. I am saying this from experience.

    I also think it’s not about targeting a particular group of people or a particular market, although there’s nothing wrong in looking at it that way. It is about engaging anyone and everyone to become part of an activity which does not necessarily have to take them away from where they are. For example, since right now, the NGO I have runs on a purely voluntary basis, I have a person in the southern part of the Philippines workign with another person in Singapore developing the website. My friend in NY will be editing videos another friend has taken of interviews with the communities we have done the trainings in. I think that if we took out people from their comfort zones, then it would be difficult to let them understand the whole context of helping others. They might think that it takes a whole lot of personal sacrifice to help others, not thinking that they can still do so from where they are. A friend always tells me this: "Give it to me in dozes so I don’t get too overwhelmed." And I think she is right – not everyone can take all these things straight up.

    In terms of youth, what do they want to do? They may want to be engaged in sports, hanging out, etc. Give it to them in dozes – have a baseball game with some fees for their parents and proceeds will go to such an d such causes. After they win, let them go to the community they want to help and give them the proceeds. they still get to play their game, only this time they have a particular cause tied to it. Then, they can grow up thinking that way – their everyday activities can contribute to help other people.

    If I were an emperor for one day, I would not want to grow a social enterprise movement. I would want to help more people set up their businesses and maintain it. Then I would pray to the gods, the dalai lama or whoever else is there to give these people the chance to recover from their initial shock and actually try and do something with the help being given to them.

    That’s my 2 cents.

    aecodera – May 19, 2006 9:23 am (#27 Total: 88)
    Audrey Codera

    "The youth are no longer JUST the future. The youth are the PRESENT." PYEN

    And I forgot to add, since our organization has been training underprivileged youth since 2004, we have encountered major problems from micro-finance institutions who, because of the government policy in place promoting yourh employment, should be giving a specific windows to underprivileged youth entrepreneurs as a start-up capital loan.

    Thus, I have been able to force my family and friends – and yes, force is the correct term – to set up a micro-finance institution, such as Curt mentioned in his note, that would ahve actual window for start-up capital loans for underprivileged youth entrepreneurs in the Philippines backed by a good business plan and willing to undergo extensive mentorship process.

    tutormentor – May 19, 2006 9:31 am (#28 Total: 88)
    Cabrini Connections Tutor/Mentor Connection

    Social problems take a long time to solve

    This discussion has a load of good ideas and it will take time to digest them all. However, my visit to the Young Social Innovators site gives me hope for what I’ll find as I visit other sites.

    What I liked about this site was the page that identified 8 major social issues and provided a path of learning and involvement through each of them.  That link is http://www.youngsocialinnovators.ie/resources/resources-for-ysi-2007/

    In my own work I use charts, like the ones in the attached pdf that illustrate the  many different groups/individuals who need to be involved form a long time, just to help a child born today be starting a job/career by age 25.  I use maps to illustrate that such a process needs to be happening in thousands of places at the same time.

    Do any of you have similar charts on your web site to illustrate the long term and comprehensive nature of social change? 

    I work with organizations who talk of "youth as leaders" as though this were going to save the world. To me, youth become adults in a few years and unless they are still acting as leaders, we won’t have gained from the investment of learning and experience that they have accumulated through many years of service.

    On the web site I visited I did not find a section that showed me how programs started by one team of youth in previous years were still being supported by some of those youth, and/or by a new generation of youth, so that the program grew in its impact and ability to solve a social need.

    In the discussion forum of http://www.tutormentorconnection.org I have a "business school connection" discussion in which I’m inviting students from business schools around the world to join in a discussion of ways they can support the growth of volunteer based tutor/mentor programs in their communities.  If any of the teams of youth entrepreneurs from this discussion would like to join, please do.

    If you have web links that illustrate some of the long-term involvement concepts that I’ve described, please share them with me and the group.

    Attachments:

    Building a Network Focused on a Common Goala.pdf (551 KB)

    Van Ajemian – May 19, 2006 2:55 pm (#29 Total: 88)

    Engaging Youth to Be Social Entrepreneurs

    Zdrastviute vcyem.

    It is good to see and hear from so many participants.  I suggest here three projects for youth social entrepreneurs and offer myself as an e-mail volunteer:

    (1) many organizations have been mentioned;  what is the chance that we could persuade a funder to set up a center, this center then to be maintained by youth social ventures, where these organizations would have a physical presence and their respective representatives would interact daily about initiatives, programs, funding, on the assumption that such interaction would accelerate social entrepreneurship among youth?  we could do this even if there were not enough budget to pay each of the representatives, as university students could be trained through service-learning to become representatives;  New York would be a good place, in the shadow of the UN building, or even San Francisco, where the UN was founded;

    (2) eBay provides an outstanding environment for buying and selling, but what if eBay, with its good international reputation, were to provide SeeBay for social entrepreneurs, including youth?  Curt DeBerg has made a move in that direction with SAGE’s seminal GISA-Bay;  the assumption is that, if eBay’s knowledge and might were tapped, more youth would take an interest in social entrepreneurship and would have a safe forum in which to buy and sell;  and as part of their "experiential learning" in social entrepreneurship, youth would contribute, with every transaction, to a fund to accelerate youth social entrepreneurship;  but eBay gets more proposals than it can deal with, so the challenge lies more in who among us  knows whom at eBay;

    (3) there are not enough youth social ventures–yet–for youth in a community to contribute into a democratically-run microfinancing fund to support youth social entrepreneurship;  until that day, how difficult would it be for youth, mentored by adults,  to do the legwork to set up and operate  local currencies for their communities?   these local currencies would be tied to social entrepreneurship, community work, and green products and services, in order to give extensive community benefit;  this would be like Ithaca Hours, www.ithacahours.com, but with a key role for youth to develop and operate the currencies.

    Van

    plamb – May 19, 2006 6:49 pm (#30 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    The ideas keep coming…

    Wow, it just keeps getting better! More and more resources and superb ideas. I like the fact that the conversation has moved back and forth between the philisophical and the practical. Good Social entrepreneurism, in my humble opinion, requires the ability to combine innovative thinking and heartfelt beliefs, and then translate those 2 into good business sense (and cents).

    Paul (Hudnut) I really like your phrase "A revolutionary with a business plan" to describe social entrepreneurs. "Entrepreneurs without Borders" is also an intriguing idea. Any information/links on that to share?

    Curt and Van, your mention of an eBay style business run by and for youth seems to have some legs…and leads back to the importance of leveraging Web 2.0 and new media for a new generation that is being raised on it.

    Joanne, nice that you are working on SE campaign descriptors that have more of a youth appeal. Let me add a few suggestions to the pot: 1) "social shout" (getting the word out about social entrepreneurism), 2) Yuthbizz (as in Youth business buzz) and 3) Social Biz (as in socially responsible business IS our business).

    By the way, folks may be interested to learn that http://www.dogooder.tv/ has just launched as a way to highlight nonprofit/NGO work. May also be an interesting platform to highlight SE work in a more youth friendly way…

    Paul

     

    sophiekendall – May 20, 2006 3:37 am (#31 Total: 88)

    I am an aspiring young social entrepeneur!

    hi,

    i live in London and am 16 in my first year of A levels. I have come across some schemes for youth from disadvantaged backgrounds but this does not apply to me; i would be very grateful for any information on support i would be elegible for (not financial but introductory advice and discussion of my plan)

    about a year ago i first decided i want to set up a fair trade restaurant which would also serve as a cultural "hub" and community centre, which would employ homeless people who have received help but now need the next stage of a job and a chance to be involved in an exciting project.  the profit would be used to support the community work going on in the restaurant as well as be used to start up more of the same in other towns. 

    Being so young ( not yet at university) i would be very grateful for advice of firstly whether you think this is a feasible idea, secondly any initiatives aimed at helping those in my position, and lastly advice on how to move forward.  I am considering taking a gap year to work with homeless people before studying politics or development studies with aspects of economics.  Do you think it would be better to do a business degree immediately instead?

    and finally do you know of anyone who has a similar idea i could get in touch with?

    any advice please do email me at angelsoph@hotmail.com i would be very grateful

    its great for me as a young person to see that there are social entrepeneurs looking to involve my generation.

    there is no doubt that my generation is full of passion to see social change we have grown up in a time when eco and ethical ideas and practices are rapidly on the rise alongside greater youth interest in social justice ideas.

    sophie kendall

    Heather B – May 20, 2006 3:50 am (#32 Total: 88)

    My project, "One magazine"

    In 1996 I launched a local newsletter working with 12 to 18 year olds. At the time I was 24, living in southern Maine.

    The newsletter quickly developed into a ‘zine and we found ourselves selling subscriptions to people around the world. The core audience was Baha’i. I functioned as lead editor and assigned stories, reviews, interviews and so on to various junior high and high school age writers. My husband, a designer, trained a 13-year-old in Photoshop and Quark, and his 12-year-old sister in file management software to keep track of our subscriptions and finances. Every Sunday, we had the whole staff over to our apartment for 4 hour stretches for editorial, design and finance review.

    Two years later we had a baby and needed to move for work reasons, and the local staff had somewhat dissolved, as the teens moved on to college, mostly west coast. We hung on with editorial content for a while longer, as the staff had become diffuse as well: my editorial team was based all over the US and beyond and we worked via email. I assembled a manual guide in time for our third volume. Then we went on hiatus.

    A year ago we revived the magazine online. I still invite people as young as 12 to contribute poetry, art and stories and I try my best to train high school and college age people as editors, when they’ll give the time to do the work. I have to agree with you that 12 to 18 year olds have the most time, and it’s very satisfying to work with that age group to craft something mature that an adult audience can appreciate as well. The capacity is all there, more so with each generation.

    The magazine is at http://one-magazine.com.

    Heather Brandon Springfield, MA

    Martin Smith – May 20, 2006 3:10 pm (#33 Total: 88)
    StartingBloc

    In the Belly of the Beast

    Sorry for the ridiculously long blog…

     

    I feel like there are two questions that need to be parsed here.  The first is how do we create young social entrepreneurs and the second is how do we teach social enterprise.

     

    In ten days, I will finish an economics program at the University of Chicago and will return full-time to work and expand StartingBloc.  In the past six months while here, I have been astounded by the disconnect between the older professors and younger professors/students. 

     

    My generation was the first to really grow up with the internet, always connected.  We are the first truly color-blind, gender-blind, global citizens.  Because technology was woven into our upbringing, we are acutely aware of inequality.  As a result, I believe this generation (25 and under) is better hardwired to understand the true tenets of what I believe the social enterprise/social entrepreneurship movement is driving towards. 

     

    Baby boomers defined CSR/social enterprise as business ethics and volunteerism respectively.  Generation X has led to the emergence of corporate social responsibility departments.  From my experience with StartingBloc and conversations back on campus, my generation (Y) is defining corporate social innovation/social entrepreneurship very differently.  We are interested in zero producer surplus business models and profit as a means.  Look at Mercado Global and Terracycle, these will be the business models of the future.  We understand that profit is the blood that drives an organization, but should never be considered the heart of an organization.  We don’t believe The World Is Flat….but we want it to be, it is a concept that does not scare us….in fact, we quit our jobs at investment banks to go work for the America India Foundation and New Leaders for New Schools to ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity to compete in the global marketplace (examples of StartingBloc Fellows this year). 

     

    So, I think this generation understands the concept behind the word social entrepreneurship better than any other generation.  To tie the Generation Y concept of what political economy and enterprise should look like to the word social entrepreneurship/social enterprise, we need to do a couple of things:

     

    Education – Practical

    I agree with Audrey.  I don’t think we can teach people how to become social entrepreneurs.  However, I think we can cultivate a culture of innovation among youth.  We can do so by changing the way we educate young people.  Rather than top down education, we need to create more opportunities for the voice of youth to be heard.  Nearly everyone in my economics classes questions the assumptions of neoclassical theory that we are being taught, but it is very hard for us to challenge it in class.  Part of this will be done by virtual marketplaces for ideas (like 1Bloc or Social Edge), but this needs to become a bigger part of our philosophy of education.  Offline, the voice of youth needs to be respected.  As media is going through a democratization revolution, so to must education. 

     

     

    Education and Research – Theory

    We need to thread the concepts of social enterprise and corporate social innovation into our current economic models and then get it taught in every single economics class.  The non-profit sector is not even modeled in my macroeconomics courses (the US non-profit sector generated revenues that exceeded that of all but six foreign countries in 2000) When I talk about StartingBloc or social enterprise or CSI to Nobel Laureates in econ at the U of C, they don’t believe in it and they don’t get it.  When I talk to my classmates, they get it right away.  Research into the economics of CSI and SE is so far behind practice.  David Baron is taking a hard-nosed approach to better defining SE and CSI at Stanford.  Once we can better articulate what SE and CSI are, we can completely rewrite economics textbooks (or at least add sections) and then teach the theory in high schools nationwide.

     

    A Career in Social Enterprise, not just as a Social Entrepreneur

    The best social entrepreneurs are catalysts, not revolutionaries.  Revolutionaries get shot, end up in prison, burn out, etc.  Revolutions are short-lived.  Truly create social entrepreneurs lead entire lives of innovation.  The best social entrepreneurs, those like Jon Schnur of New Leaders for New Schools, realize that the difference between a social entrepreneur and a social enterprise is strategy and operations.    To build successful social enterprises, social entrepreneurs need to move beyond charismatic leadership to create level 5 organizations as Jim Collins calls it. 

     

    If we want to build a social enterprise movement, then social enterprise needs to be seen as a career opportunity: not simply being a social entrepreneur, but also playing a supporting role in an entrepreneurial organization.  The best learning grounds for youth may be as interns or junior level employees at entrepreneurial organizations.   

     

    Mentoring

    We now run a mentorship program between MBAs and StartingBloc Fellows (18-25) and we are now extending it so StartingBloc Fellows mentor high school students during our Institute as well.  Tutormentor is absolutely right, the problem with volunteer programs and student chapter networks is that don’t facilitate a concept of lifelong learning.  The timeline of an Ashoka Fellow is 20+ years long.  StartingBloc Fellows are guided from their first internship to their first job to graduate school to hopefully their first venture etc.  Through mentorship, individuals (youth) can gain perspective on how they can incorporate social, economic, and environmental innovation at every stage of their career and life.

     

    Funding

    I know of few if any organizations that give significant funding to youth led ventures.  Echoing Green, YSEI, and the ImagineNations Group are the only three I can think of.  YSEI and ING are only focused on the developing world, we need more in developed countries as well.   I actually send older board members with gray hair to meetings with “traditional” funders because of discrimination against youth (me).         

     

    Watch 1Bloc.com starting in July.  Many of the ideas on this listserv are exactly what we are doing on 1Bloc.   The site is only available to StartingBloc Fellows right now but will launch to the public in July.

    aecodera – May 21, 2006 5:53 am (#34 Total: 88)
    Audrey Codera

    Funding

    Good ideas so far!

    Martin, I agree with you. When it comes to funding, it is better to send more mature people with funding institution, though I don’t have that luxury. I guess to a certain extent, I was lucky to have found YSEI who believed in me and what I wanted to do. I was also lucky to have YES Campaign find me which allowed me to start my NGO work in something I believed in and something I have been looking for.

    There is one impoertant thing that a lot of people have already brought up: FUNDING. Because of the attention social entrepreneurship is receiving, more and more people recognize social entrepreneurs. However, this attention is currently translated to a pat in the back with the exception of institutions such as YSEI, Echoing Green, ING who actually invest on youth.

    Social entrepreneurs do not just need a pat-in-the-back acceptance. The best pat-in-the-back one could ever receive is the change in the people/community one is helping.

    Social entrepreneurs need investors – people to invest in them and in their cause through funding and mentorship. Until people are ready to invest, it would be very difficult to encourage youth to look at social entrepreneurship as a career path.

    "The youth are no longer JUST the future. The youth are the PRESENT."

    Susan Cippoletti – May 21, 2006 8:24 am (#35 Total: 88)
    Girl Scout Program Developer

    Funding Youth Projects

    I wholeheartedly agree that as a society, we must not only intellectually but financially invest in youth driven projects. That is why when Girl Scouts decided to pursue social entrepreneurship as a pathway for leadership development, we agred there had to be direct financing for the girls. Challenge & Change invests in the girls’ training and also subsidizes the start up costs related to their community driven projects. Although the dollar amount is small, the stipend provides a great incentive to actually begin the work. During training, the girls wil learn to use the seed funding as leverage to find local partnerships, community champions and/or in kind donations. Through national partnerships, we are now able to provide greater seed funding directly to the girls. We hope the direct funding will make a difference in the degree of committment from the girls. We have met challenges in the past due to the competition for youth in their out of school hours. Due to the increase in homework and their desire for multiple afterschool activities, we have found it is sometimes difficult for young people to commit the time needed for in depth projects.

    As I pointed out in my previous e-mail, this program is in the early pilot phase. In order to measure success, Girl Scouts of the USA has invested funding to track the curriculum’s progress in the pilot year. A national evalaution is currently under way and detailed reports must be completed by local program managers on the girls’ projects. The combination of the reports and the evaluation should provide a comprehensive view of how social entrepreneurship translates to teen girls.

    In the programs noted in previous e-mails, are any under current formative evaluation or have results to share? To my experience in the youth development sector, many funders or schools mandate qualitative and quantitative results when teaching new programs. I have not read any mention of evaluation thus far. I would be interested in learning more on this point from my colleagues in this sector. This has been a great overall sharing experience.

    Marielle – May 21, 2006 8:24 am (#36 Total: 88)

    SE: the nice, juicy alternative

    as with everything indie, anything on the fringe, unique and non-mainstream seems pretty cool to the youth (generally). social entrepreneurship (fortunately or unfortunately) at present enjoys this status and placement. capitalize on it. i’m tossing out possible treatment here for whatever campaign you guys might be thinking of. just a suggestion though. this type of treatment would work with the word-of-mouth PR strategy mentioned, which could just be part of a bigger, bolder campaign on promoting SE (one that would involve dangling a tempting carrot of funding and mentoring, like YSEI and echoing green–more people have to know about these guys).

    SE could be presented as…the cool alternative to joining the corporate ratrace, or something of the sort. think trading in shirts and ties and musty offices for jeans, sneakers, fulfillment and a lot of pre-quarter life angst (i half-jest).

    I toss out these ideas because cultivating young social entrepreneurs isn’t simply a matter of presenting new opportunities and making them shiny and appealing to the youth, it’s about challenging a culture and a traditional mindset of post-graduation-hook-up-with-large-corporation-to-make-me-rich-and-buy-my-dreamhouse-car-and-attract-aesthetically-appealing-spouse. just make it known that there is an attainable alternative to that type of lifestyle. one wherein there are good support systems, encouraging enough for the youth to pursue.

    just some quick thoughts: gather your success stories, organize and publicize. think SExy.

    – marielle, philippines

    aecodera – May 21, 2006 9:30 am (#37 Total: 88)
    Audrey Codera

    Evaluation

    Susan, that’s a good program you have. I wanted to ask if you have presented such community-projeects and also brought up the question on sustainability with the girls you’re dealing with? I’m assuming you have because one of the things they have to deal with even from the onset of their projects is how to make it sustainable. Since the funding only provides minimal inputs (and I think you are doing well in providing a stipend since these girls would otherwise not be able to pursue their projects), their community projects should have a way to makee profit in order for it to continue outside your funding.

    On the evaluation method. You are also correct – both qualitative and quantitative are essential. Statistical data are easy to get and you can get it within the program. Based on experience, I would suggest that if you have the manpower, try on constant monitoring (interviews/mentorship/consultancy) process where you can get reports from mentors/consultants. The more personal the method is, the more information you can get for your documentation. Survey questionnaires are also helpful, but make sure you are there to follow it up.

    It is important not to expect too much after any training program or after the release of funds since the effect of social entrepreneurship is social change – which does not happen overnight. In effect, we are investing on people.

    Since we deal with underprivileged youth, for example, we have done several interviews with community-leaders, parents, friends of the youth we’ve helped. During those interviews, we would get statistical data as well – how much did we give, how much was made out of it (in monetary terms, intangible terms, etc). It is a tedious process, but the more important factor in all these is the qualitative evaluation since that’s where one can see the changes in attitudes, outlook, values, etc. in a person.

    Susan Cippoletti – May 21, 2006 10:19 am (#38 Total: 88)
    Girl Scout Program Developer

    Re: Evaluation

    Audrey, thank you for your response. As for the first part of your reply, no I have not presented any project outcomes since we are in the first year of the curriculum. There is nothing to report YET! Girls are just getting ready to head off to the training programs around the United States. So we shall see what they learn and more importantly how they learn it. It is challenging to teach to different learning styles, as we all know. But yes girls are taught the concept of sustainability. It is a bit of a painful lesson for youth to understand though. They get to work hard and initiate projects near and dear to their hearts but one day may have to hand off their work and accomplishments to another in order for the project to endure. Say when they go off to college.

    As for the evaluation, GSUSA has contracted an outside firm to objectively assess impact and document outcomes. This will be done through pre and post surveys, case studies and a strong logic model to track immediate to long term outcomes. Of course, we are following the standard US protocols of an IRB review to ensure child safety.

    As we all know, strong statistical data & rich stories along with the the evalaution report is in many cases the best tool for securing longer term funding for our projects. Funders now seek to support projects that demonstrate outcomes. So a good evalaution can provide any organization with tools for the future.

    tau – May 21, 2006 2:07 pm (#39 Total: 88)
    Universal Strength Foundation

    I think some solutions to encouraging the youth to become social entrepreneurs will be found in understanding some of the basic habits and thinking of Generation Y, also known as Millennials, Echo Boomers, Google Generation and some of my favorites the "iPod" generation ,Generation Xbox and the "instant-messaging generation". All of these descriptive names give us key information of the ways of the youth.  They are serious multi-taskers and love technology so teaching programs have to be incredibly stimulating, or they’ll get passed over. The social entrepreneurs’s way of being has to be endorsed by the new social heroes – celebrities – The Brangelina – Bono factor is already making it an easy sell to the youth that ‘double coolness’ comes from being successful and caring. The successful part will have to be stressed, I believe the youth are not impressed by self-sacrifice anymore, their role models, appear to have an infinite amount of money and power, and most will aspire to be this way. Successful business people will have to be play an active role in inspiring good-will based business behavior. Bill and Melinda Gates are great examples of this. But the youth need to hear more stories of people that became successful because of their outreach, Oprah being a great example.

    We are living in a capitalist paradigm – so I believe money will be the strongest motivator for a greater level of social entrepreneurship, it is going to be a hard sell until the social entrepreneurs of today are financially successful. If I had a teenager now, I am sure I would be faced with the question, “Why are you donating so much to charity if you can’t pay the bills?” Until the “double bottom line” has sufficient proof that it works, it is going to be a hard sell, to the youth or anyone for that matter.

    plamb – May 23, 2006 6:59 am (#40 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    Summary of discussion so far

    Folks: Wanted to take a moment to summarize the input so far, and to offer some of my own supplementary thoughts (in italics). Next I will post some of the unanswered questions posed by participants along with some interesting ideas and discussion threads along the way. Finally I will post a resource listing that I compiled based on your input. Here we go…

     • As 500 million young people enter the workforce over the next decade, how do we expect to nurture a thriving movement of social entrepreneurs if they are largely left out of the equation?

     Answers: through student chapters at schools and on campuses (e.g., Netimpact.org, eonfire.org, Suas.ie, etc.

    We cannot nurture a movement unless we engage in an organized effort to do so, including sharing great and successful models in the mainstream & fringe media, supporting the development of broad based curricula for school-based and after school (club) implementation, training SE educators, providing seed capital & ongoing mentoring. Most importantly, youth themselves need to be excited and engaged, and THEMSELVES decide whether or not to create a movement. The rest of us can only provide some good tools, ideas, and capital. We must trust youth to be their own movement builders and innovators, and allow them to answer this question…

    How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

     

    Answers: Via face to face exchanges with existing social entrepreneurs; financial investment in young social entrepreneurs (e.g. Youthventure.org, echoinggreen.org, etc.); make SE trendy, sexy and hip; define what SE is and then create it as a viable career option; Get 20-30 year old Social entrepreneurs mentoring high schoolers; expand existing youth project (e.g., Youthventure.org, SAGE, Triskeles.org, etc.); “Let them be part of the story” and show youth they have the power to change the world; embrace popular culture; create new exchanges (marketplaces) with guaranteed access for youth; weave a social element into youth-targeted entrepreneurial programs wherever they reside; leverage the “service-learning” pedagogy through organizations like Campus Compact; through more active involvement of business, civic, and education leaders; emphasize entrepreneurship training over financial literacy; showcase SE products and services to youth through international SE trade fairs and competitions; encourage a culture of innovation among youth; use word of mouth strategies to market and publicize; highlight successful business people who are giving back as examples – youth pay attention to these business celebrities.

     

    The philosophy of SE needs to be clearly articulated, and GREAT and EXCITING examples need to be shared in ways that appeal to youth. As many have said, we need to distinguish clearly between SE and standard business models, and perhaps create new marketplaces that capitalize on emerging trends such as Web 2.0. Then we need to provide runways and resources for youth to innovate, and get the heck out of the way.

     

    What projects stand out as good examples of best practices in the Youth Social Enterprise (YSE) space?  

    A

    Answer: See a listing of YSE organizations and efforts in my next post.

    • Finally, if you were emperor for a day, how would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

     

    Answers: Through new online tools like social networking (1Bloc); through franchising successful social enterprises (e.g., a Teen Media Network) that encourages youth to co-create and share successful models; change the language and create a youth-targeted campaign; form a coalition of youth SE organizations; ally with micro-enterprise lending institutions that will provide loans to youth; create international YSE listserve; incorporate the concepts of social enterprise and corporate social innovation into modern economic models that get taught in every economics class.

     

    I would invest in a series of model social enterprises that are developed and run by youth, that prove to be successful businesses and have real impact on a large scale. These can serve as flagships for the movement. I would simultaneously trumpet the current work being done in the field through mass media campaigns and a variety of youth channels (e.g. a “New (Youth) Heroes” series). I would build a youth marketing social enterprise, run by youth, whose mission it is to get the word out about youth social enterprise specifically. I would simultaneously develop an R&D platform and youth SE incubator, that serves as a shared, open source idea pool for SE projects and provides back office support (like accounting tools, etc.) for launching new businesses. I would create a fund for financing youth SE projects. I would engage some high profile business and entertainment celebrities to invest in youth run social enterprises in which they are part owners. Finally, I would organize an annual Youth Social Enterprise Congress and regional conferences, both real and virtual.

     

      

    Additional ideas:

     

    ·          Need a celebrity with youth appeal to be a spokesperson

    ·          Need to train more teachers (and provide high school and college level curriculum) to teach Social entrepreneurism

    ·          Need more social entrepreneurs speaking to and inspiring students at schools and universities

    ·          Develop a new economics that better define SE and corporate social innovation and explains why they are necessary; create new marketplaces and exchanges for SE

    ·          Figure out how SE figures into traditional notions of value creation

    ·          Create a social issues/solution fair (similar to science fairs in schools)

    ·          Create a youth enterprise “eBay” or virtual international marketplace

    ·          Youth setup local currencies (e.g. http://www.ithacahours.com/) tied to social enterprises

     

    plamb – May 23, 2006 7:02 am (#41 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    Unanswered participant questions and more interesting thoughts so far…

    Unanswered Questions:

     

    1)      Recommended resources for environmentally sustainable small business ideas?

    2)      ” i want to set up a fair trade restaurant (in the UK) which would also serve as a cultural "hub" and community centre, which would employ homeless people who have received help but now need the next stage of a job and a chance to be involved in an exciting project.  the profit would be used to support the community work going on in the restaurant as well as be used to start up more of the same in other towns.” Is this project feasible, are there initiatives that can help me in this effort, and any general advice on moving forward?

    3)      Does anyone have results to share from formal evaluations done on youth social enterprise programs/projects?

     

     

    Interesting thoughts:

     

    ·          69% of high school students in the USA say they want to start their own business, but 9 out of 10 rate their entrepreneurial knowledge as poor  or fair at most

    ·          Don’t worry about defining SE, or get hung up on the phrase “social entrepreneur”, youth will be drawn to engaging ideas and opportunities no matter what you call them

    ·          A social entrepreneur is a “revolutionary with a business plan”

    ·          The “Millenials” (under 25) generation is better hardwired to understand and accept social entrepreneurism. We are the first truly color-blind, gender-blind, global citizens, and the first generation to really grow up with the Internet, always connected.

    ·          “I don’t think we can teach people how to become social entrepreneurs. However, I think we can cultivate a culture of innovation among youth.”

    ·          Social entrepreneurism has to be endorsed by the new social heroes – celebrities – in order for youth to take notice.

    plamb – May 23, 2006 7:06 am (#42 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    Liting of YSE organizations and efforts

    Folks: Attached are some of the YSE resources we have collectively generated so far. Please let me know if corrections/revisions are needed and by all means let us know if you know of other resources we need to add.

    Thanks!

    Paul

    Attachments:

    youth_social_entrepreneurship__orgs_052206.doc (65 KB)

    mike roberts – May 23, 2006 12:53 pm (#43 Total: 88)
    first nations development institute

    wrestling with the creating/mentoring social entrepreneurs issue in Indian Reservation communities

    Here is a project for which we received some pilot funding for and will know more about the results/outcomes in a year or so:

    First Nations’ Leadership and Entrepreneurial Apprenticeship Development (LEAD) program will: 1) encourage Native college and university students to become the future leaders of reservation-based nonprofits; 2) build the resources of existing leaders in the Native nonprofit sector; and 3) support Native nonprofits that are working to build leadership capacity in rural and reservation-based communities.  This program dovetails with the Ford Foundation’s dedication to enhancing civil society and community development and to supporting emerging practitioners in philanthropy. 

     

    To achieve these objectives, LEAD will: 1) provide nonprofit sector career path opportunities for university students and/or young professionals, 2) provide leadership development opportunities and training for current nonprofit leaders to increase their effectiveness and 3) provide strategic grants and technical assistance to Native nonprofits to support their internal capacity and to potentially implement volunteer, internship and fellowship programs of their own. 

     

    Our concept for this program is based on the following premise:

    1)      Reservation-based nonprofits, most of which have been formed over the past 20 years, are at a precarious place in their evolution.  In many cases, these organizations are facing leadership transitions due to the retirement of the organizations’ founders without clear identification of who will take on the mantel of the organizations’ leadership and direction.

    2)      Native American students and young professionals, primarily those in fields of business, are looking to obtain valuable, hands-on skills that will enable them to expand the possibilities for career options.

    3)      Native nonprofit leaders, primarily those relatively new to the field, need opportunities to further develop their existing leadership skills.

     

    By facilitating social entrepreneurship and developing leaders of the future, we will ensure a diverse American philanthropic sector and instill a strong commitment to effective and ethical philanthropy in Native young people. LEAD will ultimately help to build a strong and healthy nonprofit sector that is critical to meeting Native communities’ needs.  First Nations already has created momentum for this program by focusing our activities on strengthening Native nonprofit capacity. 

     

     

    The linchpin of LEAD will be the LEAD Fellows Program, an intensive, one-year, full-time internship in the Native nonprofit sector to train emerging Native leaders in nonprofit management. 2005-07 will mark this pilot program’s launch.  The Fellowship will 1) provide Fellows with first-hand exposure to nonprofit businesses and opportunities to add value through business skills and 2) to expose them to career possibilities in the nonprofit sector. 

     

    The Fellowship will combine a rigorous yet flexible curriculum with an individual learning plan, facilitated mentoring, peer learning and networking, and industry-specific leadership development. Fellows will spend most of their time in experiential, hands-on learning at selected Native nonprofit host organizations, under the guidance of seasoned industry mentors. LEAD Fellows will be immersed in all phases of nonprofit management and leadership, including setting strategic direction, fundraising and program management.

     

    Gunalchéesh (Thank you),

     

    Mike

     

     

    Michael E. Roberts (téix sháach tsín)

    President

    First Nations Development Institute (www.firstnations.org)

    703 3rd Avenue, Suite B

    Longmont, CO  80501

    303.774.7836

    mroberts@firstnations.org

     

     

     

    paul_hudnut – May 23, 2006 1:57 pm (#44 Total: 88)

    Follow up to Paul L.

    The idea of "entrepreneurs without borders" hatched at a conference in February. We are very open to including others- at this point it is a group including Colorado business schools, as well as some in Southern California and the Northwest. The current group is mix of microfinance experts, entrepreneurs and international business/development people.

    The name is going to change, as someone else "owns" the name, and while catchy, we have decided that we can do better. The basic concept is to use mentored student teams in one country to assist microenterprises in another country who wish to expand to the student’s country. It is about building networks and innovative energy, not sending students to other countries (which is expensive, and a tad paternalistic; trips may happen, but they are not the primary focus). We hope to recruit team mentors from private companies and NGOs.

    If you are at a business school (graduate or undergrad; particularly with entrepreneurship focus) particularly in US or Mexico or an entrepreneur that works with such a program as a mentor, please contact me and we can chat in more depth. This is still early stage, and we are still researching and brainstorrming on the who-what-where-how.

    Paul

    paul.hudnut@business.colostate.edu

    kmniazi – May 24, 2006 11:11 am (#45 Total: 88)
    Development Professional

    Social Entrepreneurship or Entrepreneurship First

    Dear All,

    Sorry for joining in so late, but just read the notice about the conference.

    have an issue with the topic. i am from a place, where the entrepreneurial spirit is not so strong. in my area of operations (NWFP, Pakistan), its more like 89% of students want to get a good job and are not even thinking about starting their own business.

    so should i focus on entrepreneurship or social entrepreneurship. please evaluate your areas of operations also. if there is a strong entrepreneurial culture, then introduce social entrepreneurship, otherwise just introduce plain entrepreneurship. i would be happy to see 5% of 500 million as social entrepreneurs and the rest as capitalists, who can be approached for funding.

    nickmoraitis – May 24, 2006 9:33 pm (#46 Total: 88)
    TakingITGlobal

    TIG, networks, UK funding, TV programs etc.

    Hi everyone!

    I’m also sorry for coming to the conversation so late! I just got to the Social Edge newsletter in my inbox this week. I was excited to see that TakingITGlobal was mentioned in several earlier postings… Just to correct the "resources" document, TIG provides at least the first three categories of support for young social entrepreneurs – we have a school-based program that provides teachers/students with curriculum and online community (esp. in the US), a local program in specific countries that provides more intensive assistance & mentorship to youth leaders/SE’s (we’re rolling this out in a big way in Canada this year, following pilot work in Russia and Sierra Leone amongst other countries), and we facilitate advocacy for YSE (TIG often acts as facilitator of youth participation in major UN/other processes such as around the information society, HIV/AIDS, the MDGs, and Urban Development).

    We have not generally provided funding ourselves (being a poor youth-led non-profit!) but we have channeled mini-grants to youth to run local action projects, as well as actively contributed to the conceptualization of various programs nationally and internationally (such as the GKP YESEI). We generally think it is the integrated approach we take to YSE – building community & networks, engaging the school system, providing tangible support, and facilitating space for advocacy within global policy platforms that is key to whatever success we have had thus far.

    On a more personal note, I guess there are many lessons to be learnt from TIG not only as a supporter of YSE, but primarily as a YSE itself. It’s been a tremendous challenge getting TIG off the ground (I started full-time work as Strategy Coordinator when I was 18) and keeping it sustainable, and people still struggle to grasp what kind of beast it is that we are. Not only because we’re non-profit that generates a significant portion of our revenue through service-income, but also because of our loose network: it’s hard to measure many of the most exciting results we have which sometimes happen at the periphery of our direct influence. While social entrepreneurship is garnering support, some of the other characteristics of this generations ‘approach to social organizing’ is only just beginning to gain currency (through the commercial success and profile of tools such as myspace.com and facebook). All good I guess! After having spent a year away as youth coordinator at a very large traditional international NGO, I definitely appreciate the beauty and efficiency of youth social enterprise!

    I was thinking about my own educational experience and ways in which it encourged SE – and I think one of the most empowering experiences I had during high school was a "class" (with classtime alloted each week) that every year/grade 9 student had to take called the "Individual Research Project". Basically we could choose to learn about anything we wanted, as long as we could demonstrate in some relatively practical way that we were an "expert" on the subject by the end of the year. All of us were paired with internal school mentors (who were just personally interested in the subject) as well as with a mentor in the broader community (although not necessarily the same city even). Everyone in my class came up with incredible things – some learnt instrument making and produced their own beautiful guitars, others tried to crack scientific mysteries with some very promising results, others still taught themselves juggling and built popular online communities around the subject. I personally decided to learn about how young people were using the Internet, and my research ended up turning into a series of articles & a book published in several countries. Not everything was so "successful" but the learning style that encouraged independent action, active (sometimes two-way) mentorship rather than teacher-student relationships, was essential. This is more about entrepreneurship than SE, but there was still no profit motif: and I think if we’d been told to "ensure some social benefit" that would have been even better. Key is providing a trusting space within the classroom setting for self-directed learning – something that apparently happens far too little today.

    On another subject, Sophie from London asked about places to go for support & advice. A great organization is Unlimited (www.unltd.org), and one of my former TIG colleagues works there now on their youth program "The Big Boost". You can apply for grant of up to several thousand pounds I believe, and they emphasize mentorship and assistance with business planning. If you have initial success, you’ll be eligible for additional (and greater) funding too. Bless the UK national lottery.

    Paul mentioned Dogoodertv (I hadn’t come across that, so thanks – very interesting!). Another similar program that’s been on CBC (and which TIG is briefly featured in…) is a seven-part 30 minute series called "Make Some Noise". Check it out at http://www.makesomenoise.tv (small clips of every episode are online). It’s produced in a very dynamic style, definitely trying to make SE cool for the MTV generation. (Pity therefore it’s on CBC but that’s a good start!)

    Thanks for the great discussion all. Nick

    lostboyca – May 25, 2006 10:58 pm (#47 Total: 88)
    Vansouk Lianemany

    My Thoughts

    How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs?

     

    Answer:  I think the best way is to get successful social entrepreneurs to do speeches and seminars on the subject.  Young minds like to listen to people who has been through it all before through the good times and the bad times.  Youth likes to see statistics on the success and failures and learn from them.  Youth are scare to explore the unknown by themselves.  To top it off it would help if the successful social entrepreneurs do little projects with youth that are interested and hold their hands to make sure that that the project will succeed and if the project succeed explain to them why it failed.  I have not been too involved with the youth projects due to other goals I have in life at the moment such as my education.  But I do hope to get back in the community, especially to the low income family youth.

     

    How would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

     

    Answer:  I would have courses in high school on the subject and make it a criteria to graduate.  The course would consist of group activities and a small project for each group.  The project would last roughly 6 months.  With each project there would need to be detail reports on how it was successful or a failure and how to overcome them.  I would rely on celebrities to promote social entrepreneurs with their funds and time as well.  Today’s Youth look up to celebrities and want to be as successful as they are.

    Mark Lewis – May 26, 2006 12:24 pm (#48 Total: 88)
    CEO/Executive Director; Strategic Business Intelligence Group

    Creating SE Curriculum in Dallas high schools

    The Strategic Business Intelligence Group is installing a curriculum in social entrepreneurship for high school students here in Dallas, where there is virtually nothing in SE at any level at this time.  Any help is appreciated if any of you have ideas feel free to email me at thoughtmatrix@yahoo.com.  I’m also looking for speakers in September and mentors/internship partners in the DFW area.  I’m looking for financial partners and social stakeholders in Dallas as well as contacts with experienced SE people nationally.

     

    jasoncarvalho – May 27, 2006 9:45 am (#49 Total: 88)
    socialentrepreneur@gmail.com

    GlobalTribenet.org

    Hello,

    Please do not forget about www.globaltribenet.org and www.globalyouthfund.org. :)

    Kind Regards,

    JL

    plamb – May 29, 2006 12:40 pm (#50 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    A last shout out and then a summary

    Folks: thanks so much for contributing all of your wonderful thoughts and resources around the topic of YSE. There is clearly alot going on around the world relative to youth social enterpreneurism, and it seems to be an activity whose time has come. Not that this is something brand new. On the contrary, youth have been involved in social projects (and some would argue even more actively than adults) for many years and in many innovative and important ways. But it is only recently that we have come up with a more standard name for this activity and begun to view it as a discipline in its own right.

    Ones of the biggest challenges moving forward is how to move all of this incredible energy and activity to the next level through increased funding, training, coordination, and the incubation of social businesses that scale. Lots of superb ideas in the above discussion about how to do this, and I will post a summary of those ideas and thoughts in the next post. But I would humbly suggest that the best and final answers the key questions will come from youth themselves in ways that we can only begin to imagine. Let’s continue to support that process  of discovery and the evolution of YSE in whatever ways we can, and remember that the sooner people become socially engaged, the more likely they are to make it a lifelong commitment!

    Thanks again for joining!

    Paul

    p.s. the summary report I am posting next includes a resource listing (in the order of contributions made by discussion participants).

     

    plamb – May 29, 2006 1:03 pm (#51 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    Final Summary

    Folks: Below is a summary of our discussion over the last two weeks. I have included my own supplementary thoughts in italics). My apologies for any errors and omissions. Attached is a resource listing compilted from our collective input.

    • As 500 million young people enter the workforce over the next decade, how do we expect to nurture a thriving movement of social entrepreneurs if they are largely left out of the equation?

     Answers: through student chapters at schools and on campuses (e.g., Netimpact.org, eonfire.org, Suas.ie, etc.

    We cannot nurture a movement unless we engage in an organized effort to do so, including sharing great and successful models in the mainstream & fringe media, supporting the development of broad based curricula for school-based and after school (club) implementation, training SE educators, providing seed capital & ongoing mentoring. Most importantly, youth themselves need to be excited and engaged, and THEMSELVES decide whether or not to create a movement. The rest of us can only provide some good tools, ideas, and capital. We must trust youth to be their own movement builders and innovators, and allow them to answer this question…

    How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs, and not just train future professionals to be ethical business practitioners?

     

    Answers: Via face to face exchanges with existing social entrepreneurs; financial investment in young social entrepreneurs (e.g. Youthventure.org, echoinggreen.org, etc.); make SE trendy, sexy and hip; define what SE is and then create it as a viable career option; Get 20-30 year old Social entrepreneurs mentoring high schoolers; expand existing youth project (e.g., Youthventure.org, SAGE, Triskeles.org, etc.); “Let them be part of the story” and show youth they have the power to change the world; embrace popular culture; create new exchanges (marketplaces) with guaranteed access for youth; weave a social element into youth-targeted entrepreneurial programs wherever they reside; leverage the “service-learning” pedagogy through organizations like Campus Compact; through more active involvement of business, civic, and education leaders; emphasize entrepreneurship training over financial literacy; showcase SE products and services to youth through international SE trade fairs and competitions; encourage a culture of social innovation among youth; use word of mouth strategies to market and publicize; highlight successful business people who are giving back as examples – youth pay attention to these business celebrities; leverage new multimedia tools (e.g., http://www.makesomenoise.tv or www.dogooder.tv)

     

    The philosophy of SE needs to be clearly articulated, and GREAT and EXCITING examples need to be shared in ways that appeal to youth. As many have said, we need to distinguish clearly between SE and standard business models, and perhaps create new marketplaces that capitalize on emerging trends such as Web 2.0. Then we need to provide runways and resources for youth to innovate, and get the heck out of the way.

     

    What projects stand out as good examples of best practices in the Youth Social Enterprise (YSE) space?  

    A

    Answer: See a listing of YSE organizations and efforts in my next post.

    • Finally, if you were emperor for a day, how would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

     

    Answers: Through new online tools like social networking (1Bloc); through franchising successful social enterprises (e.g., a Teen Media Network) that encourages youth to co-create and share successful models; change the language and create a youth-targeted campaign; form a coalition of youth SE organizations; ally with micro-enterprise lending institutions that will provide loans to youth; create international YSE listserve; incorporate the concepts of social enterprise and corporate social innovation into modern economic models that get taught in every economics class.

     

    I would invest in a series of model social enterprises that are developed and run by youth, that prove to be successful businesses and have real impact on a large scale. These can serve as flagships for the movement. I would simultaneously trumpet the current work being done in the field through mass media campaigns and a variety of youth channels (e.g. a “New (Youth) Heroes” series). I would build a youth marketing social enterprise, run by youth, whose mission it is to get the word out about youth social enterprise specifically. I would simultaneously develop an R&D platform and youth SE incubator, that serves as a shared, open source idea pool for SE projects and provides back office support (like accounting tools, etc.) for launching new businesses. I would create a fund for financing youth SE projects. I would engage some high profile business and entertainment celebrities to invest in youth run social enterprises in which they are part owners. I would organize an annual Youth Social Enterprise Congress and regional conferences, both real and virtual. Finally, I propose an alternative higher education pathway, a type of Social Change University. High School graduates with an interst in SE would have the option of enrolling in a short training and mentoring program, followed by aproximately 2 years of business implementation. In order to earn a "degree", students must have either launched a successful social organization/business or prove sufficient learning during the process through hands-on projects.

     

      

    Additional ideas:

     

    ·          Need a celebrity with youth appeal to be a spokesperson

    ·          Need to train more teachers (and provide high school and college level curriculum) to teach Social entrepreneurism

    ·          Need more social entrepreneurs speaking to and inspiring students at schools and universities

    ·          Develop a new economics that better define SE and corporate social innovation and explains why they are necessary; create new marketplaces and exchanges for SE

    ·          Figure out how SE figures into traditional notions of value creation

    ·          Create a social issues/solution fair (similar to science fairs in schools)

    ·          Create a youth enterprise “eBay” or virtual international marketplace

    ·          Youth setup local currencies (e.g. http://www.ithacahours.com/) tied to social enterprises

     Interesting thoughts:

    Attachments:

    youth_social_entrepreneurship__orgs_052906.doc (66 KB)

     

    ·          69% of high school students in the USA say they want to start their own business, but 9 out of 10 rate their entrepreneurial knowledge as poor  or fair at most

    ·          Don’t worry about defining SE, or get hung up on the phrase “social entrepreneur”, youth will be drawn to engaging ideas and opportunities no matter what you call them

    ·          A social entrepreneur is a “revolutionary with a business plan”

    ·          The “Millenials” (under 25) generation is better hardwired to understand and accept social entrepreneurism. We are the first truly color-blind, gender-blind, global citizens, and the first generation to really grow up with the Internet, always connected.

    ·          “I don’t think we can teach people how to become social entrepreneurs. However, I think we can cultivate a culture of innovation among youth.”

    ·          Social entrepreneurism has to be endorsed by the new social heroes – celebrities – in order for youth to take notice.

    Cori – May 30, 2006 10:33 am (#52 Total: 88)

    Strongheart Fellowship

    In addition to OneGlobalTribe.org (a GREAT YSE Org) and Global Youth Fund (AWESOME idea), I think Invisible Children is of note for creating a youth movement in the US for Northern Uganda and using SE as a key component.

    Also http://www.strongheartfellowship.org is a "boutique NGO" but with a singular, focused goal – giving exceptional young people from extreme circumstances the opportunity, tools, and resources to become leaders in development through enterprise.

    jerry.kaiser – May 31, 2006 5:52 am (#53 Total: 88)

    The path of least resistance

    Several incarnations ago, while teaching Social Studies in a public high school, I had the opportunity to design courses which I thought would be engaging as well as educational. One of these was a community leadership/internship program, which involved businesses and other organizations in the community.

    Students had the opportunity to gain credit through volunteering/interning. In the process, they interviewed employers, customers, beneficiaries of the various organizations. This opportunity empowered students to feel more a part of the social fabric of their community, and to participate more fully in it.

    paul_hudnut – May 31, 2006 8:12 pm (#54 Total: 88)

    Not done yet!

    I ran into this one, which looks interesting as well: http://www.younginventors.org/

    According to the founder, Anne Swift, it has 1400 members. Aimed at High School and College inventors, and has a "social entrepreneurship" component.

    I appreciate those of you who have contacted me about our fledgling organization, which will be called "Opportunities without Borders".  I will keep people posted on developments on my blog until we get a website up and going. http://bopreneur.blogspot.com/

    Paul

    chrismacrae – May 31, 2006 10:07 pm (#55 Total: 88)

    various levels to this question

    1 develop an open online curriculum for teachers of 9 years olds up on social entrepreneurs; I am horrified to see standard definitions of entrepreneurs (all about money) used in US education of social studies

    2 the main social entrepreneur networks could have a better collaboration map of the main youth networks that are changing the world; understand the coordinators of these networks eg http://www.takingitglobal.com/ and work out how to collaborate

    3 education needs radical change anyhow; we strongly support the idea that cities need younghubs http://www.frappr.com/younghubs ; these are an un-schools (ie experimenting in the community with stuff top-down standard curricula and examination obsession never practices) and are designed to attract eg early teens so they can get involved in community project teams or vocational learning that they co-create instead of hanging out on the street; rule number 1 of a younghub is all cultures welcome; if educational was more vocational and if the citizen sector is the big new one…

    4 public broadcast media is doing a poor job compared with that we expected in 1984 http://www.normanmacrae.com/netfuture.html#Anchor-Changin-27687 on making social entrepreneurial challenges as popular as spectator sports – join our pledge to  find ways of encouraging BBC governors to be less afraid of questioning today’s big conflicts and loss sustainabilities http://www.pledgebank.com/bbcgames if the world service and largest public broadcaster doesn’t get SE what’s the chances that any broadcaster will

    5 http://goodwillwars.blogspot.com/ unseen wealth*health: the world is being ruled by a huge mathematical mistake in which the way consequences and value compounds exponentially forward is not governed by organisations; if goodwill was wholly and truly measured organisation would be far more concerned to audit and resolve conflicts; the entrepreneurial revolution language properly developed can change economics so that human relations systems are mapped around :

    context, does an organisation prioritise a measure around its most purposeful goal above standard metrics

    trust-flow audit to resolve conflicts

    transparency – no silos or blocks to trust-flow at boundaries of organisations

    compound exponential mapping http://exponentials.blogspot.com/ of goodwill- as goodwill truly measured involves systemic patterns of human relations; these are already spiralling ahead either in a sustainable exponential for all interested stakeholders or towards destruction; local societies are one of the stakeholders ; if a company loses all the trust of society in a transparent world social value of 0 is multiplicative as Andersen found out; if leaders understood connectivity is multiplicative not additive as assumed in standard accounting , risk analysis decisions would be made differently and social entrepreneurial views would be mainstream to all entrepreneurial values as well as economics ; let’s tutor youth about an economics fit for the network age http://er100.blogspot.com/

    http://entrepreneurialrevolution.blogspot.com 2006 is 30th birthday of my father’s entrepreneurial revolution survey in The Economist – any ideas on how to co-sponsor real or online alumni contests welcome -eg I am piloting a survey of shareholders of The Economist to see if they recall that the paper was founded by one of the 19th century’s world champions of social entrepreneurship- could the survey http://www.valuetrue.com/home/gallery.cfm be re-edited to test an opinion leading group that interests you?

    C.M.Macrae.72@cantab.net

     

     

    Paige – Jun 9, 2006 4:36 pm (#56 Total: 88)

    The forgotten age group

    I think we need to take a look at not only the youth, but people in their mid 20’s and 30’s. I feel there is always so much attention paid towards children, and rightfully so, but our future lies in the hands of the people that are in their 20’s and 30’s now. I think we need to reach out to them. Expose and inspire.

    plamb – Jun 12, 2006 12:54 pm (#57 Total: 88)
    Paul Lamb

    response – The forgotten age group

    Paige: You are absolutelty right. In fact, while most of this discussion has focused on the 25 and under "youth" crowd, this is just an arbitrary cutoff. We need to do as much as possible to engage young adults, and not-getting-any-younger adults too!

    I think there is an assumption that anyone who is 25 or above is immediately getting all of the social enterprise resources they need, and that is likely not the case. Perhaps focusing on this "middling" group and THEIR particular needs would be a good topic for another Social Edge forum discussion???

    Paige – Jun 13, 2006 12:48 pm (#58 Total: 88)

    YES!

    I can’t speak for the rest of the crowd, but I would love a discussion on reaching out to "the middling group". I think many people are trying to reach out to this group, but doing it unsuccessfully. I feel that dealing with "youth" and "young adults" we need do be careful of how we position things. Using terms like "activism" can be a turn off. I think that if you want to get youth involved in the social world you need to show them how being aware and being involved can lead to personal growth and fulfillment that they may not find in the material world.

     

    Nadaindia – Jun 13, 2006 3:53 pm (#59 Total: 88)
    Towards well-being

    Involving the young

    Yes,

    Dear Friends,

    Greetings from Nada India…

    Increasingly it has become necessary to create spaces where marginalized sections of the society like the young people can raise issues pertaining to their daily lives. These spaces are rare and hard to come by. Nada India has created an unique space  in samll way where adolescents living in urban slums  and urban village can voice issues which are part of their daily lives through radio clubs.

    The radio clubs seeks to train individuals in radio programming and listening whereby they can represent their section of the society and raise problematic issues and give voice to the silent individual living amongst them.

    Suneel Vatsyayan

    www.nadaindia.info

    scoutbanana – Jun 16, 2006 12:18 pm (#60 Total: 88)

    From a youth social entrepreneur

    I have been reading the series of messages that people have been posting on this subject and I feel that I need to put in my two-cents. Being a youth and a social entrepreneur I have found this topic very interesting. I was actually a host on this site about a year ago on youth and social entrepreneurship (SE). I currently run a small non-profit project that benefits a health center in Uganda, East Africa. The project is in year 6, Phase III, with 16 chapters in colleges across the US and Canada, so far we have raised over $100,000 for an ambulance, medical supplies and other necessities.(www.scoutbanana.catholicweb.com) Since I am so late in joining I will give my thoughts on the 2 following questions:

    How can we best engage young people to become active social entrepreneurs?

    Answer: The best way to engage young people to become social entrepreneurs is not to give speeches or seminars, but to present opportunities and activities that are focused on the idea of social entrepreneurship. Young people want to do something, not just hear about it. Don’t get me wrong hearing about it is good, but experiencing SE is a better way to learn and continue later in life. The youth do need to know before they can do, but the enphasis should be on action. Success and failure then depends on how the opportunities are marketed to the youth and how well the projects or activities are run.

    How would you go about building a Youth Social Enterprise movement?

    Answer: Getting youth involved at the High School age is a key. At my school we were required to have so many community service hours to graduate and I feel that was a building block to SE. I also know that to recieve the Michigan MEAP award/scholarship there is now a service hour requirement. So youth will become socially engaged and maybe continue. One organization that I know that is doing an amazing job of getting youth involved in HS is Netaid. They started-up a Global Citizen Corp where youth lead their classmates in learning about and taking action on global social issues. It is amazing what the youth have been able to do. (www.netaid.org) Also I know someone mentioned earlier the Invisible Children campaign to end the war in Northern Uganda (www.invisiblechildren.com) Youth are making a difference, creating and engaging other youth in SE projects.

    To close I have to agree with Paul Lamb that youth have been active in SE projects for many years and just now there is a term for what youth have been doing. And I could also not agree more that the ‘best and final’ answers will come from the youth themselves in new and interesting ways. All we, the youth, need is support and enthusiasm.

    tutormentor – Jun 18, 2006 6:51 am (#61 Total: 88)
    Cabrini Connections Tutor/Mentor Connection

    The path already exists. Teach them to use it

    Every day a newspaper, TV/Radio or Internet report calls our attention to problems that need to be solved in our world. The Internet provides a research library for anyone who wants to build an understanding of the problem, and to innovate ways to solve the problem.

    It does not matter the age of the person who decides to walk this path. What matters is how dig they deep, how long they reflect, and how long they stay involved. Big problems won’t be solved over night, or in a dozen years. Thus, the youth we focus on today will be senior citizens of the future.

    However, the process of solving a problem will remain the same. Do the research, do some what "if"ing, invite some people to join you (or join someone else who already is working to solve the same problem), then begin to apply your idea. Learn from what works, innovate new ways to get better. Add more people to your team.

    If young people begin to learn how to take this role (and many already are), then their web sites will become meeting places for older people and future younger people.

    I think some of the web sites suggested already offer links to places where young people are working to solve problems. I’d like to learn how these groups are working to keep young people involved in the same problems as they become older people who may have more experience, more wealth and more influence to bring to bear on the problem.

    SGrove – Jun 21, 2006 10:15 am (#62 Total: 88)

    Embrace diversity

    I don’t mean this in the sense we ususally use it, around race, class, gender.

    Instead look at the research on entrepreneurs such as this blog: http://paullight.blogspot.com/

    There is incredible diversity in motiviation, approach, and the type of problems tackled. There is diversity on the scale from pure economic interest in making money to pure nonprofit.

    This diversity is good and its a reflection in the diversity of people, including our youth. Empower youth to look at who they are, waht they want, and what problems they are called to work on and embrace thier individuality.

    hklaird – Jun 22, 2006 7:26 am (#63 Total: 88)
    Director of Marketing & PR, Junior Achievement of Georgia

    Hi all,

    Thanks for starting this terribly important discussion.  I’ve worked with youth for years and in youth development/education-based organizations for many years and it’s exciting to see this movement growing.

    I currently work at Junior Achievement, an organization that was established over 85 years ago to help develop youth entrepreneurs.  There are starting to be some great examples of social entrepreneur-type programs in JA programs across the globe.

    I was particularly interested in the following statistics.  Does anyone have a source for this?   

    "69% of high school students in the USA say they want to start their own business, but 9 out of 10 rate their entrepreneurial knowledge as poor  or fair at most"

    Thank you!  I look forward to following this discussion.

     

    granderiviere – Jun 25, 2006 10:16 am (#64 Total: 88)

    Have you heard of the Xchangers – in the CAribbean?

    Xchange is a movement of young people in the Caribbean who have pledged to adopt a positive lifestyle.  Xchange is developing a network of young social entrepreneurs who reach young people at the community level transforming their lives through music, art, sport and other youth friendly media.  The movement is youth led and was nurtured with the support of Machel Montano, well known Caribbean entertainer, Derrick Lewis, Creative Director of Island People (events organisers) and UNICEF.  The movement is growing based on a set of principles and practices..and has developed a youth network online.  Its biggest challenge is funding of the youth action plans…since funds to the Caribbean are very limited.  More information on Xchange is available through the Caribbean UNICEF offices.  Ideas about how xchangers can get more involved in the social entrepreneurship movement would be welcomed.  Contact: cvillar@unicef.org or cnorton@unicef.org.

    Yolande – Jun 26, 2006 2:50 am (#65 Total: 88)

    Yolande Beckles CEO Global Graduates in the UK

    Global Graduates is a not-for-profit organisation based in the UK that supports and develops talented youth from disadvantaged communities over 5000 students have gone through this successful. However the realism for many that wish to enter the world of business and entrpreneurism is that they don’t come from the economic backgrounds to sustain these projects straight out of school and university.

    Linking young people around the world which such ideas and opportunities is a brilliant one but it all takes funds.

    Not to end down beat we are launching in Africa, Nigeria from October so if there are any contacts based there that we can immediately link to please email me on yo@globalgraduates.com

    tutormentor – Jun 30, 2006 7:29 am (#66 Total: 88)
    Cabrini Connections Tutor/Mentor Connection

    Add your links to Tutor/Mentor site

    Yolande, Global Graduates sounds like a great organization.  I encourage you to add the link to your web site in the LINKS section of http://www.tutormentorconnection.org

    I also encourage you to read some of the essays in the Tutor/Mentor Institute. My vision of volunteer-based tutoring/mentoring is that the volunteers recruited from businesses in a community stay involved in the lives of youth like relatives and neighbors and church people do in the lives of kids who live in more affluent areas.

    The result of this can be a network of people who open doors to jobs and careers for young people, and who help raise the funds needed to sustain these programs. Without this business connection, I feel most of us working to help kids move to careers will be without the funds needed over the long term to help more than a few kids.

    I organize a volunteer recruitment campaign in Chicago every Aug/Sept and its goal is to build visibility among volunteers so that more will search the links and Program Locator on our site to find volunteer opportunities. If they use this resource to find a place to volunteer, my hope is that they will also use it to find information and a network of peers to help them be succesful as volunteers.

    If this happens we can stimulate the sharing of good ideas through volunteers to programs all over the world.

    At http://www.tutormentorconference.bigstep.com/generic54.html you can see a list of eConference forums held in May 2006.  My goal is to repeat these every 3 months. In August, such forums would focus on volunteer recruitment and would help build visibility for participating programs.

    I encourage members of this discussion to organize on-line forums that connect organizations within your countries with each other and with potential volunteers, and then link your forums to the Tutor/Mentor Connection and to each other.

    Collectively we can raise more visibility and recruit more volunteers than we each can by working alone.

     

    tonymv – Jul 3, 2006 4:59 am (#67 Total: 88)
    Tony Lombardi, The Safe Haven Project Inc.

    Advancing the message of Social Entrepreneurship to Young People

    Hello everyone. I am so happy to have found this discussion and hope to be engaged in it as time passes. Our program, "The Safe Haven Project" (http://safehavenproject.org) has been working for years now in a couple of different mission areas. One is direct service to young people with HIV and AIDS from the US and Africa. The other is education of the greater community of young people about service, the power of the individual to create profound social change, and the need for a new generation of leaders. As we have traveled these twelve years presenting to students in conferences and schools, we have heard over and over again, a question that is both profound and welcomed: "How can I start a program that will make a difference?" In response to that question we have developed "The Safe Haven Project Summit on Service" which will take place from August 1 – 6 in Cambridge MA
    (http://summitonservice.org)

    It is our hope that this foundling project will take on a life of its own and connect young people with the information and tools they need to take their passion and turn it into action.

    We are seeking interested parties who may be interested in either being a plenery presenter, operations assistant, or student mentor during this exciting week. More information is available through Idealist at:

    http://www.idealist.org/if/idealist/en/SiteIndex/AssetViewer/view?asset=Org&asset-id=20025-58&sid=62481745-211-YWGEL

    In the spirit of continued service, I look forward to our discussions here and hope I can add something to the mix. Take care Tony

    Rebecca (www.funedesin.org) – Jul 5, 2006 12:13 pm (#68 Total: 88)

    Yachana Technical High School — a new spin on social entrepreneurship

    Hi all,

    If you haven’t already heard about YACHANA (yah-CHA-nah) and the organization’s feats in responsible tourism and Fair Trade products, here’s something new that reaches out to today’s youth:

    The Yachana Technical High School in Ecuador’s Amazon region brings a new spin to the idea of social entrepreneurship. The high school program was opened in 2005 by the foundation FUNEDESIN to benefit indigenous and mestizo youth living in the region. With this program, FUNEDESIN aims to help local youth become community leaders, betters stewards of their own resources, and create a new generation of social entrepreneurs.

    The Yachana Technical High School promotes conservation of the the Amazon’s biodiversity by emphasizing sustainability, income-generation, innovation and entrepreneurship. The high school does not charge tuition, and is designed to be as self-sustaining as possible. Students raise most of their own crops and produce for consumption, and sell the surplus to nearby villages and Yachana Lodge for profit. The income generated from sales is redirected back into the school in the form of infrastructure and capital for additional microenterprise start-ups. The students are currently managing two microenterprises (energy-saving LED flashlights and water filtration systems) that address the immediate health and economic needs of the region which generating long-term support for the high school.

    The school is nestled into the banks of the Napo River next to the tiny indigenous village of Mondana and just 2 km downstream from Yachana Lodge, a global leader in responsible tourism and sustainability. ‘Yachana’ is an indigenous Quichua word that means ‘a place for learning’, and we encourage visitors to use us as a training center for business and education retreats.

    www.funedesin.org www.yachana.com www.yachanagourmet.com

    JJSOmaha – Jul 6, 2006 7:43 pm (#69 Total: 88)

    SMS/Text Messaging

    At United eWay we’re working on developing technologies to engage the next generation of volunteer through the SMS/text messaging technologies that are out there.

    We’ve recently partnered with Mobile Accord out of Denver to help us work towards these goals.

    Imagine being able to contact and engage volunteers through your cell phone, a medium that many of the next generation is already used to using.

    I’d be open to hear your thoughts and suggestions on this medium.

    Carmencita Hernandez – Jul 6, 2006 9:13 pm (#70 Total: 88)

    Youth and Social Marketing: Youth’s Contribution to the Alleviation of Poverty

    Hello,

    I am Carmencita Hernandez of the Sustainable Agriculture Grassroots Action Multi-Purpose Cooperative (SAGA), Philippines.  We are currently developing programs to increase awareness and heighten the mainstreaming of organic rice and muscovado sugar and eventually to help export these produce.

    One project that is in progress is involving youth in the mainstreaming and marketing of organic products.  Integral in this project is the interaction of the youth with the farmers and their communities.  We are hoping that this project would propel exports of organic rice and muscovado sugar and other organic products.  At this point, we plan to target specific municipalities or towns.

     

     

     

     

    Pamela McLean – Jul 9, 2006 2:10 am (#71 Total: 88)

    Yolanda asked for links to Nigeria.

    Yolanda – on behalf of Global Graduates –  asked for links to Nigeria. Cawdnet is active in Nigeria. We are always ready to try to help people to make contacts there (as far as our resources allow). 

    Young Nigerians become"corpers" after graduating – they do a year of community service directly after getting their degree (My recollection is that this is compulsory if you  graduate under the age of 30). 

    Pam 

    darian311 – Jul 10, 2006 7:10 pm (#72 Total: 88)
    http://www.villagethegame.com

    Village the Game: Play the world of social enterprise

    I’m so glad to see this discussion happening on Social Edge. For years I’ve been asking this question "How to get more youth involved in social entrepreneurship?" and now I am working on producing one of the answers: a video game where players practice setting up businesses in third world countries. You can find the one page game proposal at http://www.villagethegame.com. I’m always looking for feedback.

    I believe that once young people get familiar with all the amazing and effective business models and appropriate technology already out there, these young people will want to be a part of spreading these powerful solutions. Giving them a chance to experiment with different businesses and technology through a video game is the perfect way to foster that familiarity.

    tomsavage – Jul 13, 2006 7:17 am (#73 Total: 88)

    Social Enteprise Day

    I’d like to quickly draw your attention to Social Enterprise Day, which forms part of Enterprise Week here in the UK, on the 16th November. It’s involved in trying to encourage young people (14-30) to think about starting social businesses. It’s heavily supported by the new Minister for the Third Sector, Ed Milliband, and it’s likely to grow and grow in terms of its ability to spread the message to young people.

    Have a look at www.starttalkingideas.org for more information. If any organisations are willing to lend their support, either by running an event, attending, or raising awareness – I’m sure they’d be extremely grateful.

    I myself am a young social entrepreneur, having started www.blueventures.org and find it extremely encouraging that the government here in the UK are finally trying to recognise social enterprise for its contruibution to society.

    Thanks for your posts

    hlantos – Jul 21, 2006 7:01 am (#74 Total: 88)

    NYAC – Youth Venture

    We are the National Youth Advisory Council for Youth Venture ( www.youthventure.org ). We wanted to point out that there are thousands of kids who are taking initiative to create social change in their communities in the US and around the world. Youth Venture is an organization that supports youth like us, ages 12 to 20 to launch our own social ventures by providing mentorship and monetary support of $1,000. Here are some examples of the outstanding work that some Youth Venturers are doing:

    Shawn Henry founded Garden Angels in December, 2002 in Brooklyn, NY. Today, Garden Angels has 50 core members and almost 200 young supporters who participate in events and programs. Garden Angels, their first project, transformed a nearby abandoned, trash filled lot into a park and a community garden. Garden Angels also sponsors programs that raise awareness about relevant community concerns, such as library services and multicultural understanding. The Garden Angels have become a staple of the East New York Community. They won the Grand Prize for school based organizations at the Fleet Youth Entrepreneur Competition and Shawn was also named a distinguished finalist in 2004 by the Prudential Spirit of Community Award.

    Charlotte Buchanan started SeniorConnect after volunteering at an assited living facility near her house. In her time there, she found that many of the elderly reseidents were far away from their families and felt very disconnected. In order to help them, connect with their loved ones she started a program to facilitate electronic communication between seniors and their families. Charlotte and other teenagers vist the assisted living facility with laptops computers which they use to help the residents write, send, and receive e-mails. Not only does her project help the elderly residents stay in contact with their own families, but it helps create an inter-generational connection between people in her town.

    Also, in conjunction with Ashoka: Innovators for the Public ( www.ashoka.org) Youth Venture is launching in 9 new countries: India, South Africa, Thailand, France, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico. Here is an example of one team, Pukaar, in India which we find most exciting:

    Of the many organizations working with street children in Bombay, India, hardly any have ever been created or run by street kids themselves. Sameer and Rajesh, two former street kids, have formed an association called Pukaar, which provides a range of services to young street kids, including providing food and shelter to rights training to instruction on where to access vocational training and health services. In the last year, this network has enabled 50 youth to permanently move off the streets.

    As you can see there are a lot of youth all over the world who are standing up to problems they see in their communities and taking action. Know that we don’t plan on slowing down anytime soon.

    Sincerely,

    The NYAC

    Check out www.youthventure.org or e-mail ny@youthventure.org for more information. Also, check out www.ashoka.org for more information on social entrepreneurship.

    hlantos – Jul 21, 2006 7:02 am (#75 Total: 88)

    Running for a Reason

    As members of Youth Venture’s National Youth Advisory Council, we are committed to our role as young social entrepreneurs and following through on systemic change in our areas of interest. We are also here to be a resource and launching pad for new ideas so that young people all over the world have access to identify a need and make a difference. In the words of Youth Venture, "Dream it. Do it." Our own special interests have been in support of unmet health and educational needs in our community. One project raises awareness and financial support for the uninsured and under insured children in need of hospice care and grief counseling through a local non-profit organization. We have done this since 2003 by combining our love of running and healthy living with our wish to help this unmet health care need. Youth Venture has supported our publicity and website building, www.runningforareason.org, which in turn has helped our philanthropy. Our other major project focuses on health science and is called The ABC’s of Healthy Relationships. We use the model of peer teaching and web access to strengthen our message. Clearly young people like us can have a powerful influence.

    Julia and Katie Ransohoff

    hlantos – Jul 21, 2006 7:23 am (#76 Total: 88)

    Operation Outreach: Spring into Reading & Writing

    My name is Kyle Taylor. I was born and raised in Anaheim, CA. I am a recent graduate of American University and currently live in Washington, DC.

    Venutre Info:

    Background: Operation Outreach: Spring into Reading & Writing A Tutoring & Mentoring Program that matches college students with 3rd graders to develop reading, writing, and mathematics skills. The 3rd graders also write and illustrate their own children’s story that we publish. We also host them on our campus for a day of seminars and experiential learning.

    This venture makes me a social entrepreneur because I developed it from the ground up. Operation Outreach was born with the idea of creating social change in a responsible, proactive manner.

    Additional info about my venture: We are now in our fourth year of operations and our second year as a YVA venturer. We have worked with over 400 elementary students and gotten more than 1000 college students involved in the process. We are currently working to spread our program to other college campuses across the country.

    Kyle Taylor

    CarlaHarris – Aug 7, 2006 6:53 am (#78 Total: 88)

    An Inspiring Story that Teaches Kids How to be Entrepreneurs

    To all the kids out there who are interested in entrepreneurship and business, I want to tell you about a book that has changed my son’s direction and priorities. Ryan is 11 years old and like other kids, he spent lots of his time playing video games and chatting online, but all of that has changed since he read a book called "Tyler and His Solve-a-matic Machine" by Jennifer Bouani

    The story teaches kids how to be entrepreneurs in a fun way. The character development is amazing and is on target for kids ages 9-12. The author certainly understands her audience and has done an excellent job of introducing the business concept in a fun fantasy way. I highly recommend it to any parent, teacher, and educator

    Carla Harris

    Teacher

    Takoma

    Jeff.Mowatt – Aug 30, 2006 5:52 am (#79 Total: 88)
    P-CED

    Inspirational movies

    3 years ago here there was a thread started by Jeff Skoll about a proposed collection of inspirational films. It happened that recently a former scientist I know whose town was dedidcated to producing "Satan" missiles in Ukraine before he took up social issues, had more or less the same idea recently and it struck me that if anything had developed from this it would be a good starting point rather than re-inventing the wheel.

    Perhaps even more valuable in this part of the world with a culture which celebrated the achievements of the "Party" than the efforts of any individual.

    Is there such a collection now?

    Jeff Mowatt

    SocialEClub – Feb 1, 2007 2:24 am (#88 Total: 88)
    Social Entrepreneur Club

    Young Social Entrepreneurs Are Here!!

    Hello,

    We are the Social Entrepreneur Club at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, California. We will work together to challenge current social issues by developing business ideas with a pro-human outlook. Green business ideas will be our emphasis, but it will not be our only focus. We believe that college-aged students are the key to the positive change that we need.

    I am the President of this club, I am 19 years old. We are looking for individuals that are interested in spreading awareness at our confreneces. Limited of funds we are also looking for donations of any size so we make our ideas turn into realities.

    We are individuals that strive to create positive change. Join us and be a part of this change.